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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: AREAWIDE PEST MANAGEMENT PROGRAM FOR RUSSIAN WHEAT APHID AND GREENBUG Title: The role of databases in areawide pest management

Authors
item Catana, Vasile - OKLAHOMA STATE UNIV
item Elliott, Norman
item Giles, Kris - OKLAHOMA STATE UNIV
item Mirik, Mustafa - TAES, BUSHLAND, TX
item Porter, David - OKLAHOMA STATE UNIV
item Hein, Gary - UNIV OF NEBRASKA
item Peairs, Frank - COLORADO STATE UNIV
item Michels, Jerry - TAES, BUSHLAND, TX

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: November 15, 2007
Publication Date: March 1, 2008
Citation: Catana, V., Elliott, N.C., Giles, K., Mirik, M., Porter, D.R., Hein, G., Peairs, F., Michels, J. 2008. The role of databases in areawide pest management. In: Koul, O., Cuperus, G.W., and Elliott, N.C., editors. Areawide Pest Management: Theory and Implementation. CAB International, Wallingford, Oxfordshire, UK. p. 142-158.

Interpretive Summary: A database is a comprehensive collection of related data organized for convenient access, generally in a computer. The evolution of computer software and the need to distinguish the specialized computer systems for storing and manipulating data, stimulated development of database management systems. Two often-ignored components of IPM implementation are database organization and data analysis for purposes of facilitating management decisions. The definition of IPM implies that managing pests is a complex process including many internal and external factors. The chosen strategy is ideally based on detailed knowledge of the current state of the agricultural system, future behavior of the system, and the options available for pest control. Appropriately integrating all of this information for a complex agricultural system is often beyond the capability of IPM practitioners. Clearly, control decisions in many IPM systems are data intensive requiring the use of database management systems and decision-making tools, such as expert systems. As a rule, insect pests have very large geographic distributions; therefore both research and management may be more efficient when accomplished by multiple teams located throughout the dispersal range of the pest. Implementation of a database can be very powerful if several teams simultaneously work on a common project at geographically separated locations. The database concept can contribute to future progress in IPM, because it forms an information source for IPM program development and implementation. The significance of the chapter is that it outlines the considerations and steps involved in planning and developing database applications for IPM and gives concrete example of their use.

Technical Abstract: A database is a comprehensive collection of related data organized for convenient access, generally in a computer. The evolution of computer software and the need to distinguish the specialized computer systems for storing and manipulating data, stimulated development of database management systems. Two often-ignored components of IPM implementation are database organization and data analysis for purposes of facilitating management decisions. The definition of IPM implies that managing pests is a complex process including many internal and external factors. The chosen strategy is ideally based on detailed knowledge of the current state of the agricultural system, future behavior of the system, and the options available for pest control. Appropriately integrating all of this information for a complex agricultural system is often beyond the capability of IPM practitioners. Clearly, control decisions in many IPM systems are data intensive requiring the use of database management systems and decision-making tools, such as expert systems. As a rule, insect pests have very large geographic distributions; therefore both research and management may be more efficient when accomplished by multiple teams located throughout the dispersal range of the pest. Implementation of a database can be very powerful if several teams simultaneously work on a common project at geographically separated locations. The database concept can contribute to future progress in IPM, because it forms an information source for IPM program development and implementation. This chapter outlines the considerations and steps involved in planning and developing database applications for IPM and gives concrete example of their use.

Last Modified: 10/30/2014
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