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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Effect of fast food consumption on dietary intake and likelihood of meeting MyPyramid recommendations in adults: Results from What We Eat In America, NHANES, 2003-2004

Authors
item Sebastian, Rhonda
item Enns, Cecilia
item Goldman, Joseph
item Moshfegh, Alanna

Submitted to: Experimental Biology
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: February 1, 2008
Publication Date: April 1, 2008
Citation: Sebastian, R.S., Enns, C.W., Goldman, J.D., Moshfegh, A.J. 2008. Effect of fast food consumption on dietary intake and likelihood of meeting MyPramid recommendations in adults: Results from What We Eat in America, NHANES 2003-2004 [abstract]. The FASEB Journal. 22:868.7.

Technical Abstract: The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of fast food (FF) consumption on food and nutrient intakes and likelihood of meeting recommendations outlined in USDA’s MyPyramid Food Guidance System. Adults 19-50 years of age (n=2,160) who completed two 24-hour dietary recalls in the What We Eat In America, NHANES 2003-2004 were classified as FF consumers or non-consumers. Fast food consumers were divided into tertiles based upon the proportion of 2-day energy intake derived from FF. Regression procedures adjusting for confounding factors were used to detect associations between FF consumption and food and nutrient intakes and to predict the odds of meeting MyPyramid recommendations by FF consumption level. Increasing tertiles of FF intake were associated with decreasing intake of most nutrients analyzed, and, for men only, decreasing intakes from the MyPyramid fruit, meat/beans, and oils groups (p<0.01). Compared to non-consumers, FF consumers had higher intakes of total energy, fat, saturated fat, and discretionary energy. Except for the oils group for men and the grains group for women, FF consumption did not affect the likelihood of meeting recommendations for MyPyramid components. Overall, although fast food consumption was associated with higher intakes of energy, it did not improve food and nutrient intakes or enhance the likelihood of meeting most MyPyramid recommendations.

Last Modified: 9/20/2014