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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: MOLECULAR AND MORPHOLOGICAL SYSTEMATICS AND IDENTIFICATION OF IMPORTANT PLANT PARASITIC NEMATODES Title: Description of Tylenchorhynchus qasimii sp. n with a new report of T. kegasawai Minagawa, 1995 from Pakistan

Authors
item Ramzan, Musarrat - UNIV OF KARACHI, PAKISTAA
item HANDOO, ZAFAR
item Fayyaz, Shaina - UNIV OF KARACHI, PAKISTAN

Submitted to: Journal of Nematology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 12, 2008
Publication Date: August 12, 2008
Citation: Ramzan, M., Handoo, Z.A., Fayyaz, S. 2008. Description of Tylenchorhynchus qasimii sp. n with a new report of T. kegasawai Minagawa, 1995 from Pakistan. Journal of Nematology. 40(1):20-25.

Interpretive Summary: Nematodes are microscopic worms that cause global crop losses exceeding $100 billion annually. Stunt nematodes are an important group that feeds on the roots of many kinds of plants worldwide. A major problem with determining the extent of crop loss due to stunt nematodes is that the nematodes present in many areas are unknown. In this study, an ARS scientist from Beltsville, Maryland in collaboration with scientists from the University of Karachi, Pakistan describes and illustrates one new species and one known species of stunt nematodes from soil around roots of rice from Karachi, Pakistan. The results are significant because they provide valuable details that allow these species to be identified. This research will be of use to scientists, growers, action agencies and extension agencies involved in nematode research and control.

Technical Abstract: A new stunt nematode, from soil around the roots of coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) and rice (Oryza sativa L.) from Karachi, Pakistan is described and illustrated as Tylenchorhynchus qasimii n. sp. This new species is characterized by having females with 3-4 head annules, anteriorly directed stylet knobs, absence of post anal extension, presence of rounded spermatheca, conoid to bluntly rounded hemispherical tail, and longer c ratio. Males are common. Also included is record of T. kegasawai from soil near rice roots, new report from Sindh, Pakistan.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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