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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: CONTROL OF ARTHROPOD PESTS OF PECAN AND PEACH

Location: Fruit and Nut Research

Title: Forgotten natural enemies: interactions between Coccinellids and insect-pathogenic fungi

Authors
item Roy, Helen - NERC CENTRE, UK
item Cottrell, Ted

Submitted to: European Journal of Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 4, 2007
Publication Date: July 31, 2008
Citation: Roy, H.E., Cottrell, T.E. 2008. Forgotten natural enemies: interactions between Coccinellids and insect-pathogenic fungi. European Journal of Entomology. 105(3):391-398.

Interpretive Summary: The research literature on insect pest species and entomopathogenic fungi is abundant. In stark contrast, little research has been done on the interactions of natural populations of Coccinellidae with entomopathogenic fungi. Most research on entomopathogens and Coccinellidae focuses on the non-target impact of biorational insecticides against coccinellids and the impact of fungal infections upon aggregations of overwintering coccinellids; with the former overwhelmingly dominating the literature. Given the prominence of coccinellids in classical and conservation biological control, it is surprising that studies have not measured the natural impact of pathogenic fungi upon introduced species or natural populations of Coccinellidae, as has been done with numerous insect pest species. Here we review the literature on the intriguing interactions between coccinellids and fungal pathogens.

Technical Abstract: The research literature on insect pest species and entomopathogenic fungi is abundant. In stark contrast, little research has been done on the interactions of natural populations of Coccinellidae with entomopathogenic fungi. Most research on entomopathogens and Coccinellidae focuses on the non-target impact of biorational insecticides against coccinellids and the impact of fungal infections upon aggregations of overwintering coccinellids; with the former overwhelmingly dominating the literature. Given the prominence of coccinellids in classical and conservation biological control, it is surprising that studies have not measured the natural impact of pathogenic fungi upon introduced species or natural populations of Coccinellidae, as has been done with numerous insect pest species. Here we review the literature on the intriguing interactions between coccinellids and fungal pathogens.

Last Modified: 9/22/2014
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