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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Genetic diversity of wild Malus orientalis

Authors
item VOLK, GAYLE
item RICHARDS, CHRISTOPHER
item HENK, ADAM
item REILLEY, ANN
item REEVES, PATRICK
item Forsline, Philip

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: January 16, 2008
Publication Date: January 16, 2008
Citation: Volk, G.M., Richards, C.M., Henk, A.D., Reilley, A., Reeves, P.A., Forsline, P.L. 2007. Genetic diversity of wild Malus orientalis. Plant & Animal Genome XVI Conference. Annual Conference. January 12-16, 2008. San Diego, CA. pp. 137. Meeting Abstract.

Interpretive Summary: Seeds from wild populations of Malus orientalis were collected in southern Russia and Turkey in 1998 and 1999. Seedling trees from these populations are now maintained in the USDA-National Plant Germplasm System Malus collection. Four hundred ninety-six individuals representing 85 half-sib families were genotyped using seven microsatellite markers. Bayesian analyses of the genotypes revealed six distinct clusters. Most of the individuals segregated into two clusters, one containing individuals primarily from southern Russia and the other containing individuals from northern Turkey. Individuals from two of the smaller clusters were specific to collection sites near the Georgia and Turkey border. Individuals in the remaining two clusters originated from a north-central site of Turkey and several sites north of Ankara, Turkey. An Fst value of 0.076 revealed a small, but significant difference in average genetic differentiation among the six clusters. These data suggest wild populations of M. orientalis from regions around the Black Sea are genetically distinguishable and show high levels of diversity.

Technical Abstract: Seeds from wild populations of Malus orientalis were collected in southern Russia and Turkey in 1998 and 1999. Seedling trees from these populations are now maintained in the USDA-National Plant Germplasm System Malus collection. Four hundred ninety-six individuals representing 85 half-sib families were genotyped using seven microsatellite markers. Bayesian analyses of the genotypes revealed six distinct clusters. Most of the individuals segregated into two clusters, one containing individuals primarily from southern Russia and the other containing individuals from northern Turkey. Individuals from two of the smaller clusters were specific to collection sites near the Georgia and Turkey border. Individuals in the remaining two clusters originated from a north-central site of Turkey and several sites north of Ankara, Turkey. An Fst value of 0.076 revealed a small, but significant difference in average genetic differentiation among the six clusters. These data suggest wild populations of M. orientalis from regions around the Black Sea are genetically distinguishable and show high levels of diversity.

Last Modified: 9/29/2014
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