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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: The Future of Agricultural Pollination

Authors
item James, Rosalind
item Pitts Singer, Theresa

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: October 1, 2007
Publication Date: August 1, 2008
Citation: James, R.R., Pitts Singer, T. 2008. The Future of Agricultural Pollination. Book Chapter. Bee Pollination in Agricultural Ecosystems. Oxford University Press

Interpretive Summary: This chapter summarizes how agricultural production and bees are inter-dependent. Honey bees are the most commonly used agricultural pollinators in the world, but are threatened by an increasing number of hive pests. In addition, not all crops are well pollinated by honey bees (e.g., tomatoes, alfalfa seed, and crops grown in greenhouses and under row covers). Fortunately, the world holds a huge diversity bee species, although only a few of these are managed specifically as crop pollinators. Wild bees provide pollination services that often go unnoticed. Our dependence on these small insects can go unnoticed, but should serve as a reminder to our dependence, in general, on the ecosystems around us.

Technical Abstract: This chapter summarizes how agricultural production and bees are inter-dependent. Honey bees are the most commonly used agricultural pollinators in the world, but are threatened by an increasing number of hive pests. In addition, not all crops are well pollinated by honey bees (e.g., tomatoes, alfalfa seed, and crops grown in greenhouses and under row covers). Fortunately, the world holds a huge diversity bee species, although only a few of these are managed specifically as crop pollinators. Wild bees provide pollination services that often go unnoticed. Our dependence on these small insects can go unnoticed, but should serve as a reminder to our dependence, in general, on the ecosystems around us.

Last Modified: 7/24/2014
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