Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: CHARACTERIZATION OF HOST-PATHOGEN INTERACTIONS IN BARLEY AND WHEAT Title: Stagonospora nodorum utilizes a sophisticated inverse gene-for-gene system involving proteinaceous host-selective toxins interacting with dominant wheat sensitivity genes

Authors
item Friesen, Timothy
item Faris, Justin
item Liu, Zhaohui - NORTH DAKOTA STATE UNIV.
item Solomon, Peter - MURDOCH UNIVERSITY
item Oliver, Richard - MURDOCH UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: International Congress of Plant Pathology Abstracts and Proceedings
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: November 15, 2007
Publication Date: August 24, 2008
Citation: Friesen, T.L., Faris, J.D., Liu, Z., Solomon, P.S., Oliver, R.P. 2008. Stagonospora nodorum utilizes a sophisticated inverse gene-for-gene system involving proteinaceous host-selective toxins interacting with dominant wheat sensitivity genes. 9th International Congress of Plant Pathology Abstracts and Proceedings, Torino, Italy, AUg 24-29, 2008.

Technical Abstract: The Stagonospora nodorum-wheat pathosystem involves a complex of proteinaceous host-selective toxins that interact either directly or indirectly with host sensitivity/susceptibility gene products in an inverse gene-for-gene manner. Compatible interactions among these gene products are highly important in disease development. ToxA, a host-selective toxin originally identified in Pyrenophora tritici-repentis, moved from S. nodorum to P. tritici-repentis by a recent lateral gene transfer event. SnToxA, as well as SnTox1, SnTox2, and SnTox3, have each been shown to be highly important in disease development in the presence of the corresponding dominant wheat sensitivity genes, Tsn1, Snn1, Snn2, and Snn3, respectively. Preliminary data using a worldwide collection of isolates and multiple wheat mapping populations indicates that at least 10 additional host selective toxin-host sensitivity gene interactions are present. These wheat sensitivity genes have been identified on 11 different chromosomes on the A, B, and D genomes of wheat. This pathosystem may be an excellent model for other necrotrophic pathogens that utilize host-selective toxins to cause disease.

Last Modified: 10/30/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page