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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SURVEILLANCE AND ECOLOGY OF MOSQUITO, BITING AND FILTH BREEDING INSECTS Title: Ecology of Disease: The Intersection of Human and Animal Health

Authors
item Linthicum, Kenneth
item Britch, Seth
item Anyamba, Assaf - GODDARD SPACE FLIGHT CTR
item Small, Jennifer - GODDARD SPACE FLIGHT CTR
item Tucker, Compton - GODDARD SPACE FLIGHT CTR
item Chretien, Jean-Paul - DOD-GEIS
item Sithiprasasna, Ratana - AFRIMS, BANGKOK, THAILAND

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: November 30, 2007
Publication Date: March 18, 2008
Citation: Linthicum, K., Britch, S.C., Anyamba, A., Small, J., Tucker, C.J., Chretien, J., Sithiprasasna, R. 2008. Ecology of Disease: The Intersection of Human and Animal Health. IOM Forum.

Interpretive Summary: The environment, including climate, affect animal and human diseases. We describe (1) the effect of the environment on vector-borne disease, (2) the role of ecology and global climate in disease forecasting, and (3) the potential use of forecasting to reduce impact and limit spread of vector-borne disease. A relationship between climate anomalies and infectious disease have been established, particularly those transmitted by arthropods. The use of climate and ecology to predict of the 2006-2007 RVF in East Africa and subsequent observations of response activities can give us an insight about how disease forecasting based upon ecological conditions might help reduce the impact and spread of vector-borne diseases.

Technical Abstract: Environmental ecosystems and climate are closely linked and they affect animal and human diseases. We describe (1) the effect of ecology on vector-borne disease, (2) the role of ecology and global climate in disease forecasting, and (3) the potential use of forecasting to reduce impact and limit spread of vector-borne disease. Temperature plays a major role in the ability of Aedes aegypti to transmit dengue virus in Southeast Asia and possibly chikungunya virus in Africa. Rainfall affects the ability of Aedes and Culex species to transmit Rift Valley fever (RVF) in sub-Saharan Africa. Modifications to environment such as the construction of a dam and development of rice irrigation projects affect the ability of Culex species to transmit RVF in Mauritania and Senegal. Links have been established between climate anomalies and infectious disease, particularly those transmitted by arthropods such as Murray Valley encephalitis, bluetongue, RVF, Ross River virus, dengue, malaria and chikungunya. The prediction of the 2006-2007 RVF in East Africa and subsequent observations of response activities can give us an insight about how disease forecasting based upon ecological conditions might help reduce the impact and spread of vector-borne diseases.

Last Modified: 10/21/2014
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