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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: INTERVENTIONS TO REDUCE EPIZOOTIC PATHOGENIC BACTERIA IN SWINE AND CATTLE

Location: Food and Feed Safety Research

Title: Incidence and ecology of Campylobacter jejuni and coli in animals

Authors
item Horrocks, Shane
item ANDERSON, ROBIN
item NISBET, DAVID
item Ricke, S - UNIV OF ARKANSAS

Submitted to: Anaerobe
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 11, 2008
Publication Date: March 10, 2009
Repository URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/57297
Citation: Horrocks, S.M., Anderson, R.C., Nisbet, D.J., Ricke, S.C. 2009. Incidence and ecology of Campylobacter jejuni and coli in animals. Anaerobe. 15:18-25.

Interpretive Summary: Since its initial emergence in the 1970’s, the bacterial pathogen Campylobacter has been estimated to be one of the most common causative agents of foodborne illnesses. Campylobacter bacteria naturally colonize the gastrointestinal tracts of domestic and feral animals and do not necessarily cause harm to most food producing animals yet are capable of producing severe disease in humans. Reducing animal colonization by Campylobacter on the farm or just before they arrive to the processing plant is of interest because pre-harvest interventions may reduce possible contamination of retail food products thereby decreasing human illness associated with this foodborne pathogen. Limitations in effectively reducing Campylobacter on and off the farm exist, however, therefore many scientists and food processors believe that having multiple strategies including both pre- and post-harvest control techniques for the reduction of such pathogens may be the most effective approach for the control of Campylobacter. Research in this area has great potential to enhance the microbiological safety of food for American consumers.

Technical Abstract: Since its initial emergence in the 1970’s, Campylobacter have been estimated to be one of the most common causative agents of foodborne illnesses, along with nontyphoidal Salmonella species. Campylobacter species naturally colonize the gastrointestinal tracts of domestic and feral animals and are asymptomatic in most food production animals while producing acute cases of gastroenteritis in humans. Reduction of pathogens before arrival to the abattoir is of interest because pre-harvest interventions may diminish possible retail sources of infection thereby decreasing human illness associated with foodborne pathogens. Limitations in effectively reducing Campylobacter on and off the farm are evident, however multiple strategies which simultaneously utilize pre- and post-harvest control techniques for the reduction of such pathogens, may be the most effective approach for the control of Campylobacter.

Last Modified: 8/19/2014
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