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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: EPIDEMIOLOGY, ECOLOGY, AND MOLECULAR GENETICS OF ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE IN PATHOGENIC AND COMMENSAL BACTERIA FROM FOOD ANIMALS

Location: Bacterial Epidemiology and Antimicrobial Resistance

Title: Salmonella and Campylobacter Recovery from Broiler Carcasses Processed in HIMP Plants

Authors
item Bailey, Joseph
item Berrang, Mark

Submitted to: Poultry Health and Processing National Meeting Proceedings
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: September 30, 2007
Publication Date: October 8, 2007
Citation: Bailey, J.S., Berrang, M.E. 2007. Salmonella and Campylobacter Recovery from Broiler Carcasses Processed in HIMP Plants. Poultry Health and Processing National Meeting Proceedings. 35-40.

Technical Abstract: The Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) implemented an alternative to traditional inspection in young chicken plants in 1997. The new system, HACCP-Based Inspection Models Project (HIMP), makes slaughter process control an industry responsibility subject to FSIS verification. Initial baseline and verification studies by FSIS concluded that the new inspection system does not affect Salmonella recovery. In recent years, questions have been raised about the effectiveness of the HIMP system. All 20 processing plants that use the HIMP system were sampled for Salmonella incidence and Campylobacter enumeration by conventional methods. Salmonella were recovered from about 11% of HIMP processed birds and Campylobacter were recovered at a rate of less than 10 cells per carcass, both of which were equal to or better than birds from traditionally processing plants. This study re-validated the initial findings of FSIS and concluded that HIMP is a viable inspection system which does not lead to increased presence of Salmonella or Campylobacter.

Last Modified: 10/1/2014
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