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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Binge eating disorder and night eating syndrome in adults with type 2 diabetes

Authors
item Allison, Kelly - UNIV PENNSYLVANIA
item Crow, Scott - UNIV MINNESOTA
item Reeves, Rebecca - BAYLOR COLLEGE MED
item West, Delia - UNIV ARKANSAS
item Foreyt, John
item Dilillo, Vicki - OHIO WESLEYAN UNIV
item Wadden, Thomas - UNIV PENNSYLVANIA
item Jeffery, Robert - UNIV MINNESOTA
item Van Dorsten, Brent - UNIV COLORADO
item Stunkard, Albert - UNIV PENNSYLVANIA

Submitted to: Obesity
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: November 13, 2006
Publication Date: May 1, 2007
Citation: Allison, K.C., Crow, S.J., Reeves, R.R., West, D.S., Foreyt, J.P., DiLillo, V.G., Wadden, T.A., Jeffery, R.W., Van Dorsten, B., Stunkard, A.J. 2007. Binge eating disorder and night eating syndrome in adults with type 2 diabetes. Obesity. 15(5):1287-1293.

Interpretive Summary: Binge eating disorder (BED) and night eating syndrome (NES) are two forms of disordered eating that most commonly affect overweight and obese individuals. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of BED and NES among adults with type 2 diabetes. Our results indicated that among obese adults with type 2 diabetes, NES was reported more frequently than BED. These findings indicate that additional interventions are necessary to alleviate NES.

Technical Abstract: To determine the prevalence of binge eating disorder (BED) and night eating syndrome (NES) among applicants to the Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) study. The Eating Disorders Examination-Questionnaire (EDE-Q) and the Night Eating Questionnaire (NEQ) were used to screen patients. Phone interviews were conducted using the EDE for those who reported at least eight episodes of objective binge eating in the past month and using the Night Eating Syndrome History and Interview for those who scored > or =25 on the NEQ. Recruitment at four sites (Birmingham, n = 200; Houston, n = 259; Minneapolis, n = 182; and Philadelphia, n = 204) yielded 845 participants (58% women; mean age = 60.1 +/- 6.7 years; mean BMI = 36.2 +/- 6.3 kg/m(2)). Screening scores were met by 47 (5.6%) applicants on the EDE-Q and 71 (8.4%) on the NEQ. Of the 85%, (40/47) who completed the EDE interview, 12 were diagnosed with BED, representing 1.4% of the total sample. Of the 72% (51/71) who completed the Night Eating Syndrome History and Interview, 32 were diagnosed with NES, equal to 3.8% of the total sample. Three participants had both BED and NES. Participants with eating disorders were younger, heavier, and reported more eating pathology than those without eating disorders. Among obese adults with type 2 diabetes, NES was reported more frequently than BED, which, in turn, was less common than expected.

Last Modified: 7/28/2014
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