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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: INTEGRATION OF NUTRITIONAL, GENETIC AND PHYSIOLOGICAL APPROACHES TO IMPROVE PRODUCTION EFFICIENCY OF RAINBOW TROUT Title: Food Use of Whole Soybeans

Author
item Liu, Keshun

Submitted to: Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing and Utilization
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: December 3, 2007
Publication Date: May 2, 2008
Repository URL: http://riley.nal.usda.gov/nal_web/digi/submission.html
Citation: Liu, K.S. 2008. Food Use of Whole Soybeans. "Soybeans: Chemistry, Production. Processing and Utilization", L.A. Johnson, P.J. White, and R. Galloway eds. AOCS Press, Urbana, IL, pp.441-481. .

Interpretive Summary: This manuscript is a chapter for a book entitled “Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing and Utilization”, edited by L.A. Johnson, P.J. White and R. Galloway, to be published by AOCS Press, Champaign, IL. According to the book outline, this book is a monograph on every things about soybeans, with regard to history, production, chemistry, processing, and various types of utilization, including food, feed, and industrial applications. Because of my expertise on soybean food utilization, I was invited to write a chapter on food uses of whole soybeans. Historically, traditional soyfoods were made mainly from whole soybeans. So, in this chapter I cover all types of traditional soyfoods with respect to processing methods and scientific principles. I classify traditional soyfoods into nonfermented and fermented soyfoods. Non-fermented soyfoods include soymilk, tofu, soy sprouts, yuba (soymilk film), okara (soy pulp), vegetable soybeans, soynuts and toasted soy flour, whereas fermented soyfoods include soy sauce, miso (fermented soy paste), natto, tempeh, soy yogurt (fermented soymilk), sufu (fermented tofu), and soy nuggets (fermented whole soybeans). Traditional soyfoods that are commonly seen in the North American market include soy sauce, tofu, soymilk, tempeh, green vegetable soybeans, soynuts, and soy yogurt. Since soyfoods are nutritious, containing high amount of protein and other nutrients, and provide health benefits, it is believed that information on traditional soyfoods would promote food use of soybeans, stimulate entrepreneurship, and benefit soybean industry as a whole in North America. It would also allow the general public to reap the health benefits of soyfoods.

Technical Abstract: This manuscript is a chapter for a book entitled “Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing and Utilization”, edited by L.A. Johnson, P.J. White and R. Galloway, to be published by AOCS Press, Champaign, IL. According to the book outline, this book is a monograph on every things about soybeans, with regard to history, production, chemistry, processing, and various types of utilization, including food, feed, and industrial applications. Because of my expertise on soybean food utilization, I was invited to write a chapter on food uses of whole soybeans. Historically, traditional soyfoods were made mainly from whole soybeans. So, in this chapter I cover all types of traditional soyfoods with respect to processing methods and scientific principles. I classify traditional soyfoods into nonfermented and fermented soyfoods. Non-fermented soyfoods include soymilk, tofu, soy sprouts, yuba (soymilk film), okara (soy pulp), vegetable soybeans, soynuts and toasted soy flour, whereas fermented soyfoods include soy sauce, miso (fermented soy paste), natto, tempeh, soy yogurt (fermented soymilk), sufu (fermented tofu), and soy nuggets (fermented whole soybeans). Traditional soyfoods that are commonly seen in the North American market include soy sauce, tofu, soymilk, tempeh, green vegetable soybeans, soynuts, and soy yogurt. Since soyfoods are nutritious, containing high amount of protein and other nutrients, and provide health benefits, it is believed that information on traditional soyfoods would promote food use of soybeans, stimulate entrepreneurship, and benefit soybean industry as a whole in North America. It would also allow the general public to reap the health benefits of soyfoods.

Last Modified: 12/20/2014
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