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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Mining SNPs and Indels in Mung Bean (Vigna radiata) by Ecotilling

Authors
item Barkley, Noelle
item Wang, Ming
item Gillaspie, Athey
item Dean, Robin - UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA
item Pederson, Gary
item Jenkins, T - UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA

Submitted to: Convergence of Genomics and the Land Grant System: Emerging Trends in the Application of Genomics in Agriculture
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: September 1, 2007
Publication Date: September 10, 2007
Citation: Barkley, N.L., Wang, M.L., Gillaspie Jr, A.G., Dean, R.E., Pederson, G.A., Jenkins, T.M. 2007. Mining SNPs and Indels in Mung Bean (Vigna radiata) by Ecotilling. Convergence of Genomics and the Land Grant System: Emerging Trends in the Application of Genomics in Agriculture. Poster No. 72.

Technical Abstract: Ecotilling is a powerful genetic analysis tool. It can provide rapid identification of naturally occurring Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) and small insertion/deletions (indels) in a pool of accessions for a gene of interest. This technique eliminates the time consuming and expensive procedure of sequencing all individuals of a population in order to mine for DNA polymorphisms. Ecotilling was used to identify DNA polymorphisms such as SNPs and indels in a population of mung bean (Vigna radiata). Initially, V. sublobata was used as the reference DNA and compared to each member of the population classified as V. radiata to detect interspecific polymorphic sites. Additionally, accessions in the population were pooled together in a 1:1 ratio to identify intraspecific SNPs among V. radiata accessions. Numerous SNPs and indels were detected in all genes when comparing V. sublobata to V. radiata suggesting that the species sublobata and radiata are distinct. However, when accessions of V. radiata were mixed together and digested with CEL I, very few SNPs and indels were detected suggesting that accessions classified as V. radiata have limited genetic diversity. Morphological data from flowers and pod descriptors lend support to limited diversity in the USDA mung bean germplasm collection.

Last Modified: 12/18/2014
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