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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Origin & Evolution of the Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center, 1970-90

Authors
item Sandstead, Harold - UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS
item Nielsen, Forrest

Submitted to: Journal of Nutrition
Publication Type: Other
Publication Acceptance Date: July 7, 2008
Publication Date: January 1, 2009
Repository URL: http://www.nutrition.org
Citation: Sandstead, H.H., Nielsen, F.H. 2009. Origin & Evolution of the Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center, 1970-90. Journal of Nutrition. 139:173-177.

Interpretive Summary: In the early 1960s William E Cornatzer, MD, PhD, suggested the need for increased USDA research concerning human nutrition, and creation of the Grand Forks Human Nutrition Laboratory (Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center). He shared ideas with Senator Milton R. Young of North Dakota, who requested the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) prepare a proposal for such a program. In 1963 Senator Young submitted the proposal, which included construction of regional centers, to the US Senate. The Grand Forks Laboratory began operation in 1970. The attentions of Senator Young, Representative/Senator Mark Andrews, and Senator Quentin Burdick concerning the budgetary and construction needs facilitated development of the Center from its inception through 1990. Success of the enterprise rests on the creativity, industry and other qualities of the Center's scientists and support staff, and collaborators at cooperating institutions. Their work resulted in greater understanding of trace element nutrition and its role in human health.

Technical Abstract: In the early 1960s William E Cornatzer, MD, PhD, suggested the need for increased USDA research concerning human nutrition, and creation of the Grand Forks Human Nutrition Laboratory (Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center). He shared ideas with Senator Milton R. Young of North Dakota, who requested the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) prepare a proposal for such a program. In 1963 Senator Young submitted the proposal, which included construction of regional centers, to the US Senate. The Grand Forks Laboratory began operation in 1970. The attentions of Senator Young, Representative/Senator Mark Andrews, and Senator Quentin Burdick concerning the budgetary and construction needs facilitated development of the Center from its inception through 1990. Success of the enterprise rests on the creativity, industry and other qualities of the Center's scientists and support staff, and collaborators at cooperating institutions. Their work resulted in greater understanding of trace element nutrition and its role in human health.

Last Modified: 10/25/2014
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