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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Evaluation of leadplant (Amorpha canescens) germplasm collected from prairies in the Midwest USA

Authors
item Schuler, Courtney - UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA
item Vogel, Kenneth
item Baltensperger, David - TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY
item Sarath, Gautam
item Mitchell, Robert

Submitted to: Agronomy Society of America, Crop Science Society of America, Soil Science Society of America Meeting
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: September 10, 2007
Publication Date: November 7, 2007
Citation: Schuler, C., Vogel, K.P., Baltensperger, D., Sarath, G., Mitchell, R. 2007. Evaluation of leadplant (Amorpha canescens) germplasm collected from prairies in the Midwest USA. In Annual Meeting Abstracts [CD-ROM] No. 278-10. Agronomy Society of America, Crop Science Society of America, Soil Science Society of America Meeting. Madison, WI.

Technical Abstract: Leadplant (Amorpha canescens Pursh.) is a small leguminous shrub native to the prairies and plains of the central USA where it is a valuable forage species. Seed of leadplant is in high demand for reseeding grasslands to native species. Released cultivars and source identified germplasms are not available for commercial seed production. To address this problem, leadplant germplasm was collected from remnant prairies in the Midwest and Central Plains. Accessions collected from remnant prairies were classified by the Plant Adaptation Region (PAR) from which they were collected. PARs are geographical areas defined by combining Ecoregions and USDA Plant Hardiness Zones. Seedlings of the accessions were transplanted into isolated polycross nurseries for each PAR which also serve as evaluation nurseries. The leadplant germplasm in a PAR nursery represents the genetic variability of leadplant in that PAR. Accessions in each of four nurseries were evaluated for phenological development and seed yield in 2006. Growth stages included early, mid, and late vegetative; early and late bud; early and late bloom; early, late, and mature seed. Once accessions reached the mature seed stage, inflorescences were harvested and threshed on a per-plot basis, cleaned, and weighed. Similar data is being collected in 2007. In 2006, there was substantial genetic variation for all traits and it should be possible to select accessions that have superior seed yields. Data from two years of evaluation will be presented.

Last Modified: 9/21/2014