Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Contractile properties of single permeabilized muscle fibers from congenital cleft palates and normal palates of Spanish goats

Authors
item Hanes, Michael - UNIV. OF MICHIGAN
item Weinzweig, Jeffrey - UNIV. OF MICHIGAN
item Kuzon, William - UNIV. OF MICHIGAN
item PANTER, KIP
item Buchman, Steven - UNIV. OF MICHIGAN
item Faulkner, John - UNIV. OF MICHIGAN
item Yu, Deborah - UNIV. OF MICHIGAN
item Cederna, Paul - UNIV. OF MICHIGAN
item Larkin, Lisa - UNIV. OF MICHIGAN

Submitted to: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 15, 2006
Publication Date: May 1, 2007
Citation: Hanes, M.C., Weinzweig, J., Kuzon, W.M., Panter, K.E., Buchman, S.R., Faulkner, J.A., Yu, D., Cederna, P.S., Larkin, L.M. 2007. Contractile properties of single permeabilized muscle fibers from congenital cleft palates and normal palates of Spanish goats. Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, 119:1685 - 1694.

Interpretive Summary: A goat model in which cleft palate is induced by a plant alkaloid was used to determine the contractile properties of the specific muscle responsible for normal function of the tongue and throat. It was determined that the muscle fibers differ in their strength and function between the normal and cleft palate goats. This information is important in treatment and management of the cleft palate patient.

Technical Abstract: A goat model in which cleft palate is induced by the plant alkaloid, anabasine was used to determine muscle fiber integrity of the levator veli palatine muscle. It was determined that the muscle fibers of the cleft palate-induced goats were primarily of the type 2 (fast fibers) which fatigue easily vs the muscle fibers of the type 1 (slow fibers) found in the normal goat palate. This discovery partially explains the condition of persistent post-operative velopharyngeal insufficiency that affects 15-25% of cleft palate patients after cleft palate surgery.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page