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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ENVIRONMENTALLY SOUND MANURE MANAGEMENT FOR REDUCTION OF HEALTH-RELATED MICROORGANISMS AND ODOR

Location: Agroecosystem Management Research

Title: Managing Runoff from Cropland Areas

Author
item Gilley, John

Submitted to: Popular Publication
Publication Type: Popular Publication
Publication Acceptance Date: September 12, 2007
Publication Date: November 5, 2007
Citation: Gilley, J.E. 2007. Managing Runoff from Cropland Areas. Storm Water Solutions. 1(5):10-14. (Popular Publication)

Interpretive Summary: Crop yields may be negatively impacted if excessive amounts of runoff are lost from agricultural areas. Nutrients, pesticides, and pathogens transported in runoff can contribute to environmental concerns within streams and lakes. Therefore, it is important to properly manage runoff from cropland areas. The quantity of runoff from cropland areas is influenced by rainfall characteristics, soil conditions, topography, climate, and land use. Contouring, strip cropping, conservation tillage, terraces, buffer strips and grassed waterways can be effectively used to control runoff from cropland areas. Depending upon the severity of the problem, it may be necessary to use a combination of control measures to reduce runoff on selected sites to reasonable limits. The use of runoff control practices may provide important on-site and off-site benefits.

Technical Abstract: Crop yields may be negatively impacted if excessive amounts of runoff are lost from agricultural areas. Nutrients, pesticides, and pathogens transported in runoff can contribute to environmental concerns within streams and lakes. Therefore, it is important to properly manage runoff from cropland areas. The quantity of runoff from cropland areas is influenced by rainfall characteristics, soil conditions, topography, climate, and land use. Contouring, strip cropping, conservation tillage, terraces, buffer strips and grassed waterways can be effectively used to control runoff from cropland areas. Depending upon the severity of the problem, it may be necessary to use a combination of control measures to reduce runoff on selected sites to reasonable limits. The use of runoff control practices may provide important on-site and off-site benefits.

Last Modified: 10/1/2014
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