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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IPM TECHNOLOGIES FOR SUBTROPICAL INSECT PESTS

Location: Subtropical Insects and Horticulture Research

Title: Proteins expressed in the pink hibiscus mealybug, Maconellicoccus hirsutus (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae)

Author
item Hunter, Wayne

Submitted to: National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI)
Publication Type: Other
Publication Acceptance Date: February 10, 2007
Publication Date: February 10, 2007
Citation: Hunter, W.B. 2007. Proteins expressed in the pink hibiscus mealybug, Maconellicoccus hirsutus (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae). National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). EF070444-EF070605 and EF092085-EF091933.

Interpretive Summary: We produced a dataset of 315 protein sequences that are potential biological targets for new monitoring and management strategies for the pink hibiscus mealybug (PHM). The dataset was published in the National Center for Biotechnology Information, NCBI, public database. The sequences provide a unique set of genetic information for this devastating pest. While traditional chemical management measures will continue to be used against this insect pest, biological control agents often provide good control of PHM. Since insecticides kill both the insect pest and the beneficials, there is a desire to develop more environmentally friendly methods to reduce PHM. The proteins identified from this work provide new biological targets for new management strategies and new information that may aid in the mass production of PHM parasitoids and predators.

Technical Abstract: We produced a dataset of 315 protein sequences which we isolated from the pink hibiscus mealybug, PHM, Maconellicoccus hirsutus (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae). The dataset was published under accession numbers: EF070444-EF070605 and EF092085-EF091933, in the National Center for Biotechnology Information, NCBI, public database. The sequences provide a unique set of genetic information which enables the production of genetic markers for use in the monitoring of this devastating pest. Molecular makers use pieces of the DNA code inside the insects like a fingerprint to identify the insect. These tools provide a means to monitor the presence, movement, or introduction of current and exotic mealybugs into and across the USA. Genomic markers also permit to analysis of predators gut contents to determine which beneficial insects are aiding in the reduction of PHM. The pink hibiscus mealybug is a prolific insect which produces huge numbers of offspring. When large numbers of these insects are present the excretion of waste materials onto plant leaves causes several sooty molds to grow and reduce plant vigor. Traditional chemical management measures rarely work to reduce this insect pest. The release of biological control agents is currently working to manage and reduce PHM. The information from this work has provided new genetic targets which may be manipulated using emerging technologies to reduce PHM in the field, and provide new information that may aid the mass production of beneficial parasitoids and predators for their continued use in successful biological control programs aimed at the management of PHM.

Last Modified: 7/23/2014
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