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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: INVASION BIOLOGY OF INVASIVE SPECIES: BIOCONTROL AND RELATED TECHNOLOGIES FOR EXOTIC INSECT PESTS, WITH EMPHASIS ON ASIAN LONGHORNED BEETLE Title: Native natural enemies of native woodborers: Potential as biological control agents for the Asian longhorned beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis

Authors
item Smith, Michael
item Fuester, Roger
item Tropp, Joseph - USDA ARS BIIR
item Tatman, Daria - UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE
item Wilddonger, Jeff - UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE

Submitted to: Technical Report
Publication Type: Government Publication
Publication Acceptance Date: March 20, 2007
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) is among high-risk invasive species that recently invaded the U.S. from China. ALB has attacked 25 deciduous tree species in 13 genera in N.A., most notable seven maple species. Biological control represents an alternative approach for control of ALB, but to date, efforts have only identified several generalist exotic species in China. Thus, the objectives of studies reported here include: (1) to identify native wood-borers and their associated native natural enemies found infesting red maple, pignut hickory, mockernut hickory, and Virginia pine in the U.S.; and (2) to evaluate the efficacy of the native natural enemies to parasitize ALB within infested bolts in quarantine. To date, numerous wood-borers and associated parasitic wasps among 3 families have emerged from all four tree species. While most of the wood-borers and parasitic wasps have been identified to genus or family, respectively, they are awaiting taxonomic verification. To date, individuals of most parasitic wasp species have been caged onto the ALB-infested bolts. Most importantly, at least three wasps species appear to parasitize ALB-infested bolts. Furthermore, parasitization by one of the wasp species resulted in successful parasitization, development and emergence of offspring from ALB within infested bolts. This is significant in that it provides the first concrete evidence of a native natural enemy successfully parasitizing ALB outside of Asia.

Technical Abstract: Asian Longhorned Beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis (ALB), is among high risk invasive species that recently invaded the U.S. from China. ALB has attacked 25 deciduous tree species in 13 genera in N.A., most notable seven maple species. Biological control represents an alternative approach for control of ALB, but to date, efforts have only identified several generalist exotic species in China. Thus, the objectives of studies reported here include: (1) to identify native cerambycid wood borers and their associated native natural enemies found infesting red maple (Acer rubrum), pignut hickory (Carya glabra), mockernut hickory (Carya tomentosa), and Virginia pine (Pinus virginiana) in the U.S., and (2) to evaluate the efficacy of the native natural enemies to parasitize ALB within infested bolts in quarantine. To date, numerous cerambycids and parasitoids, including braconids, ichneumonids, and chalcidoids, have emerged from all four tree species stressed by one of three methods (felling, fully girdling and half girdling). Most similar to ALB, cerambycids have been recovered from girdled and half-girdled A. rubrum. While the cerambycids, and braconids and ichneumonids have been identified to genus and family, respectively, they are awaiting taxonomic verification. Individuals of most parasitoid species have been caged onto ALB-infested bolts. At least two braconid species, including Atanycolus sp., and one ichneumonid species appear to parasitize ALB within infested bolts. Furthermore, parasitization by at least one of the braconid species resulted in successful emergence of F1 offspring from ALB within infested bolts. This is the first concrete evidence of a native natural enemy successfully parasitizing ALB outside of Asia.

Last Modified: 12/20/2014
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