Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: INVASION BIOLOGY OF INVASIVE SPECIES: BIOCONTROL AND RELATED TECHNOLOGIES FOR EXOTIC INSECT PESTS, WITH EMPHASIS ON ASIAN LONGHORNED BEETLE Title: Developing fungal bands for control of Asian Longhorned Beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis, in the U.S. J. of Anhui Agri. University

Authors
item Hajek, Ann - CORNELL UNIV ITHACA NY
item Thomas, Dubois - CORNELL UNIV ITHACA NY
item Lund, Jennifer - CORNELL UNIV ITHACA NY
item Smith, Michael
item Bauer, Lea - USDA FOREST SERVICE MI
item Li, Zi - ANHUI AG UNIV HEFEI CHINA

Submitted to: Journal of Anhui Agricultural University
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 20, 2007
Publication Date: May 20, 2007
Citation: Hajek, A.E., Thomas, D., Lund, J., Smith, M.T., Bauer, L., Li, Z. 2007. Developing fungal bands for control of Asian Longhorned Beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis, in the U.S. J. of Anhui Agri. University. Journal of Anhui Agricultural University. (34):149-156.

Interpretive Summary: The Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB), native to China and Korea, is a serious invasive species in North America and Europe, with known infestations in New York, New Jersey, Chicago, Toronto, France, Austria and Germany. Studies were conducted to determine the effectiveness of three fungal pathogens for biological control of ALB. These field studies included experiments where fungi were sprayed onto trees or where fungal bands were hung within trees. Beetles were exposed to the fungal sprays and the fungal bands by caging beetles onto the trees or by allowing free roaming adult beetles to infect themselves as they walk on the bark of the treated trees. Results showed that the fungi, both as sprays and as bands, similarly reduced the number of days that adult beetles survived. However, the fungal bands continue to kill adult beetles for up to three months, while the fungal sprays are only effective for a few days. When adult female beetles, infected with the fungi, come in contact with adult male beetles, the male beetles became infected.

Technical Abstract: Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), native to China and Korea, is a serious non-indigenous invasive species in North America. Bioassays with Beauveria brongniartii, B. bassiana, and Metarhizium anisopliae against A. glabripennis, including the larvae and adult, were conducted to determine their effectiveness for biological control. Cage and non-cage field bioassays included a comparison of the effectiveness of the fungi applied as a fungal spray with fungi applied as a fungal band. Results showed that the both sprays and bands similarly reduced adult survival, but that fungi applied as fungal bands retain their efficacy for up to three months, while sprays were only effective for a few days. Sublethal effects of exposure of adult female A. glabripennis to fungal bands indicate the possible effect on reproduction and viability of eggs. Furthermore, when male A. glabripennis were exposed to infected females, they became infected.

Last Modified: 10/22/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page