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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Characterization of aromatic compounds of selected varieties of turnip greens affected by varietal and maturity differences.

Authors
item Jones, Georgia - A&M UNIVERISTY
item Sanders, Ola Goode - A&M UNIVERSITY
item Grimm, Casey

Submitted to: Journal of Food Quality
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 12, 2006
Publication Date: March 11, 2007
Citation: Jones, G., Sanders, O., Grimm, C.C. 2004. Characterization of aromatic compounds of selected varieties of turnip greens affected by varietal and maturity differences. Journal of Food Quality. 30:218-227

Interpretive Summary: As turnip greens mature, they increasingly develop a bitter taste which affects consumer acceptance. This study was undertaken to gain an understanding of the relationship between maturity and the concentration of certain compounds which produce the bitter flavor. The monitored compounds were shown to increase in three different varieties of turnip greens at different rates. The results of this study will initially aid only researchers, adding to their understanding of the relationship between the composition and flavor of turnip greens. Ultimately, the information will aid the farmer in determining which varieties to plant and when to harvest them, and provide the consumer with a quality product.

Technical Abstract: Turnip greens (Brassica rapa), a member of the Brassica family, are commonly consumed in the southern region of the United States. Typically, turnip greens have a bitter taste which becomes more pronounced as the greens mature. This bitterness is thought to be a result of degradation of glucosinolates. Several researchers have isolated glucosinolate degradation products from various members of the Brassica family. Research examining these products affected by variety and maturity of turnip greens has not been cited, therefore, this study focused on the glucosinolate degradation products of three varieties of turnip greens harvested 45, 60, and 75 days after planting. Four glucosinolate degradation products were isolated, identified, and quantitated. All degradation products increased significantly (P<0.05) as the greens matured. However, only two degradation products were significantly (P<0.05) affected by variety. Seven TOP had a significantly higher concentration of benzene propane nitrile than Purple TOP, but was not significantly higher than Tokyo Cross. Tokyo Cross had a significantly higher concentration of 1H-indole-3-acetonitrile than Purple TOP, but was not significantly higher than Seven TOP.

Last Modified: 12/18/2014
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