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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Genetic Diversity of Flowering Dogwood (Cornusflorida L.) in Tennessee

Authors
item Hadziabdic, Denita - UNIV OF TENNESSEE
item Wang, Xing Wang - UNIV OF TENNESSEE
item Trigiano, Robert - UNIV OF TENNESSEE
item Fitzpatrick, Benjamin - UNIV OF TENNESSEE
item Ownley, Bonnie - UNIV OF TENNESSEE
item Windham, Mark - UNIV OF TENNESSEE
item Rinehart, Timothy
item Xiang, Qiuyun - NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIV

Submitted to: Southern Nursery Association Research Conference
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: August 9, 2007
Publication Date: August 9, 2008
Citation: Hadziabdic, D., Wang, X., Trigiano, R.N., Fitzpatrick, B., Ownley, B., Windham, M., Rinehart, T.A., Xiang, Q. 2008. Genetic Diversity of Flowering Dogwood (Cornusflorida L.) in Tennessee. Southern Nursery Association Research Conference.

Interpretive Summary: Indigenous to the eastern United States, flowering dogwood (Cornus florida L.) is commonly found in forests and urban landscapes. Native dogwood populations are important not only for their ornamental attributes, but also as a food source for wildlife. Over the past two decades, dogwood trees have been severely affected by dogwood anthracnose caused by Discula destructiva Redlin (Redlin, 1991), resulting in a mortality range from 48-98% in the northeast US and Appalachian highlands.

Technical Abstract: Indigenous to the eastern United States, flowering dogwood (Cornus florida L.) is commonly found in forests and urban landscapes. Native dogwood populations are important not only for their ornamental attributes, but also as a food source for wildlife. Over the past two decades, dogwood trees have been severely affected by dogwood anthracnose caused by Discula destructiva Redlin (Redlin, 1991), resulting in a mortality range from 48-98% in the northeast US and Appalachian highlands.

Last Modified: 10/1/2014
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