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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ECOLOGICALLY-BASED MANAGEMENT OF BOLL WEEVILS AND POST-ERADICATION CROP PESTS Title: Developing AFLP Markers to study genetic differentiation of the Cotton Fleahopper, Pseudatomoscelis seriatus (Reuter) (Hemiptera: Miridae)

Authors
item Barman, Aburba - TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY
item Medina, Raul - TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY
item Parajulee, Megha - TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY
item Suh, Charles
item Sansone, Chris - TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: World Cotton Research Conference Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: June 18, 2007
Publication Date: June 18, 2007
Citation: Barman, A.K., Medina, R.F., Parajulee, M.N., Suh, C.P., Sansone, C. 2007. Developing AFLP markers to study genetic differentiation of the cotton fleahopper, Pseudatomoscelis seriatus (Reuter) (Hemiptera: Miridae). Proceedings of World Cotton Research Conference, September 10-14, 2008, Lubbock, TX. CDROM.

Interpretive Summary: The cotton fleahopper prefers wild weed hosts, but will move to cotton as preferred weed hosts begin to mature and become less attractive. Genetic comparisons of fleahopper populations in cotton and weed hosts may be useful for identifying the weed sources responsible for the majority of fleahoppers in cotton. Molecular markers such as amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) are useful to identify genetic similarities and differences among populations without prior genetic information. However, we found DNA concentrations obtained from individual fleahoppers were too low for AFLP analysis. In this study, we describe a method for concentrating DNA samples to obtain adequate markers for individual fleahoppers. Developing AFLP markers on an individual basis will provide a more precise means for comparing genetic variability within and among fleahopper populations.

Technical Abstract: Genetic comparisons of fleahopper populations in cotton and weed hosts may be useful for identifying the weed sources contributing the majority of fleahoppers in cotton. Molecular markers such as amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) are useful to identify genetic similarities and differences among populations without prior genetic information. However, we found DNA concentrations from individual fleahoppers (30-40 ng/microliter) were too low for AFLP analysis. In this study we describe a method for concentrating DNA samples to obtain adequate markers on an individual basis. The new DNA concentration mean was 126.77 ng/microliter, and AFLP markers were successfully obtained using MseI-CAT/EcoRI-ACT primer combination. An average of 50.4 bands with an average intensity of 528.44 Relative Fluorescent Units was found per individual. It is anticipated that the successful development of AFLP markers will ultimately provide insight on the behavioral ecology of fleahoppers, particularly in regards to population movements among weed hosts and cotton.

Last Modified: 11/26/2014
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