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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: AREAWIDE PEST MANAGEMENT OF FRUIT FLIES IN HAWAII

Location: Tropical Crop and Commodity Protection Research

Title: The Hawaii Fruit Fly Area-Wide Pest Management Program

Authors
item Vargas, Roger
item Mau, Ronald - UNIV OF HAWAII
item Jang, Eric
item Faust, Robert
item Wong, Lyle - HAWAII DEPT OF AG

Submitted to: Areawide IPM: Theory to Implementation
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: July 10, 2007
Publication Date: January 15, 2008
Citation: Vargas, R.I., Mau, R.F., Jang, E.B., Faust, R.M., Wong, L. 2008. The Hawaii Fruit Fly Area-Wide Pest Management Program. pp 300-325. In: O.Koul, G.W. Cuperus, and N.C. Elliot (eds). Areawide IPM: Theory to Implementation. CABI Books, London.

Interpretive Summary: Fruit flies are among the most economically important pests attacking soft fruits worldwide. Although scientists in Hawaii have developed most of the technologies over the years to combat accidental fruit fly outbreaks on the U.S. mainland (e.g. California and Florida), the technologies were never packaged and transferred to Hawaiian farmers. The Hawaii Area-Wide Pest Management (AWPM) program was designed to transfer these technologies to Hawaiian farmers and residents. The Hawaii Fruit Fly Area-Wide Pest Management (AWPM) Program was initiated in 1999 to suppress fruit flies below economic thresholds while reducing the use of organophosphate insecticides. The AWPM program involved developing and integrating biologically-based pest technology into a comprehensive management package that was economically viable, environmentally sensitive and sustainable. In a cooperative effort the United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, the University of Hawaii, Hawaii State Department of Agriculture, and industry developed environmentally friendly control technologies, secured special local needs registrations, implemented a fruit fly IPM extension educational program, and transferred novel technologies to local farmers and home growers. The program reduced fruit fly infestation of crops and reduced the use of organophoaphate insecticides. The program has received seven major awards for IPM technology transfer activities.

Technical Abstract: Fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) are among the most economically important pests attacking soft fruits worldwide. The Hawaii Fruit Fly Area-Wide Pest Management (AWPM) Program was initiated in 1999 to suppress fruit flies below economic thresholds while reducing the use of organophosphate insecticides. The AWPM program involved developing and integrating biologically-based pest technology into a comprehensive management package that was economically viable, environmentally sensitive and sustainable. The technologies included: 1) field sanitation, 2) protein bait sprays, 3) male annihilation with male lures, (4) augmentative parasitoid releases and 5) sterile insect releases. In a cooperative effort the United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, the University of Hawaii, Hawaii State Department of Agriculture, and industry developed environmentally friendly control technologies, secured special local needs registrations, implemented a fruit fly IPM extension educational program, and transferred novel technologies to local farmers and home growers. The program has received seven major awards for IPM technology transfer activities.

Last Modified: 9/20/2014
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