Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Conservation Practices and Gully Erosion Contributions in the Topashaw Canal Watershed

Authors
item Wilson, Glenn
item Shields Jr, Fletcher
item Bingner, Ronald
item Reid-Rhoades, P. - MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIV
item Dicarlo, David
item Dabney, Seth

Submitted to: Journal of Soil and Water Conservation Society
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 3, 2008
Publication Date: November 1, 2008
Citation: Wilson, G.V., Shields Jr, F.D., Bingner, R.L., Reid-Rhoades, P., Dicarlo, D.A., Dabney, S.M. 2008. Conservation Practices and Gully Erosion Contributions in the Topashaw Canal Watershed. Journal of Soil and Water Conservation Society. 63(6):420-429; doi:10.2489/jswc.63.6.420.

Interpretive Summary: There is a national need to measure the benefits that conservation practices have had on the health of watersheds. The objective of this Conservation Effects Assessment Program (CEAP) study was to provide this information for Topashaw Canal (TC) watershed. Stream data from a United States Geological Survey station at Hohenlinden, MS indicates that the primary water quality issue in TC is sediment. Preliminary estimates of average yearly gully erosion suggest that almost half of the sediment leaving the watershed is from gully erosion. Conservation practices implemented within the watershed since 1985 were compiled. Grade stabilization structures [Environmental Quality Incentive Practice (EQIP) No. 410] are the most common conservation practice used to control gully erosion. The goal for this CEAP study is to determine the effectiveness of this conservation practice, in conjunction with other technologies for reducing sediment yield at the watershed scale.

Technical Abstract: Quantifying conservation effects throughout the nation has been identified as a critical need. The objective of this study was to provide this information for Topashaw Canal (TC) watershed. An existing USGS stream gage at Hohenlinden, MS, indicates the primary water quality issue in TC is sediment. Preliminary estimates of mean annual gully erosion suggest that 42% of the sediment yield is from gully erosion. Conservation practices implemented within the 11,000 ha TC watershed since 1985 were compiled. Grade stabilization structures [Environmental Quality Incentive Practice (EQIP) No. 410] are the most common conservation practice used to control gully erosion. The goal for this CEAP (Conservation Effects Assessment Project) study is to determine the effectiveness of this conservation practice, in conjunction with other technologies for reducing sediment yield at the watershed scale.

Last Modified: 10/20/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page