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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IMPROVING SOIL AND NUTRIENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS FOR SUSTAINED PRODUCTIVITY AND ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY Title: Economic and Societal Benefits of Soil Carbon Management (Chapter 1).

Authors
item Kimble, J - USDA/NRCS, RETIRED
item Rice, C - KANSAS STATE UNIV.
item Reed, D - DRD ASSOC., ARLINGTON, VA
item Mooney, S - BOISE STATE UNIV.
item Follett, Ronald
item Lal, R - OHIO ST. U

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: January 17, 2007
Publication Date: May 27, 2007
Citation: Kimble, J.M., Rice, C.W., Reed, D.R., Mooney, S., Follett, R.F., Lal, R. (eds.). 2007. Economic and Societal Benefits of Soil Carbon Management (Chapter 1). pp. 3-11. Book Chapter. IN CRC Press, Taylor and Francis Group. 268p.

Interpretive Summary: Many papers and books on soil carbon management have addressed specific ecosystems such as agricultural lands, rangelands, forestlands, etc. This paper introduces a book within which each chapter begins by addressing a particular concern and potential options to manage it, along with their real and perceived benefits. The information presented uses an economic metric where possible to determine the broader value of activities that increase soil C sequestration to the land manager, society and the environment. Scientists may say a practice will reduce soil erosion, for instance, without then stating or documenting the true value of this outcome or its connection with soil carbon management, but critical links must be provided.

Technical Abstract: Many papers and books on soil carbon management have addressed specific ecosystems such as agricultural lands, rangelands, forestlands, etc. This paper introduces a book within which each chapter begins by addressing a particular concern and potential options to manage it, along with their real and perceived benefits. The information presented uses an economic metric where possible to determine the broader value of activities that increase soil C sequestration to the land manager, society and the environment. Scientists may say a practice will reduce soil erosion, for instance, without then stating or documenting the true value of this outcome or its connection with soil carbon management, but critical links must be provided.

Last Modified: 11/26/2014
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