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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Disease resistance from the USDA National Small Grains collection -- past, present, and future.

Authors
item Bonman, John
item Bockelman, Harold
item Goates, Blair

Submitted to: Phytopathology
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: April 1, 2007
Publication Date: July 1, 2007
Repository URL: http://riley.nal.usda.gov/nal_web/digi/submission.html
Citation: Bonman, J.M., Bockelman, H.E., Goates, B. 2007. Disease resistance from the USDA National Small Grains collection -- past, present, and future.. Phytopathology.

Technical Abstract: Disease resistance from the USDA National Small Grains Collection-- past, present, and future. J. M. BONMAN, H.E. Bockelman, and B.J. Goates. USDA-ARS, Small Grains and Potato Germplasm Research Unit, Aberdeen, ID The National Small Grains Collection (NSGC) had its beginnings more than 100 years ago with the creation of the USDA Seed and Plant Introduction Office. Since then, the NSGC has grown to include more than 129,000 accessions of cultivated and wild relatives of wheat, barley, oat, rye, triticale, and rice collected from throughout the world. USDA-ARS scientists and cooperators continue to acquire and maintain materials and screen accessions for disease resistance. Through hybridization and selection, new genes have been identified and deployed from NSGC accessions for resistance to cereal rusts, other foliar diseases, snow mold, and bunts. To further enhance the utility of the collection, the NSGC staff are developing precise information on the geographic origin of resistant accessions and using this information to guide further evaluation and possible exploration. Also, analysis of genetic diversity of accessions using molecular markers has begun. In the future, we anticipate that improved molecular genetic technologies will allow precise identification of r-gene diversity within the collection and provide plant breeders with information on linked markers to enable efficient transfer of resistance from landrace and wild materials.

Last Modified: 12/21/2014