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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: PEST BIOLOGY, ECOLOGY, AND INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT FOR SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE

Location: North Central Agricultural Research Laboratory

Title: Within and Between Field Movement of Diabrotica barberi and D. virgifera virgifera in the South Dakota Areawide Management Site

Authors
item FRENCH, BRYAN
item CHANDLER, LAURENCE

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: February 9, 2007
Publication Date: March 27, 2007
Citation: French, B.W., Chandler, L.D. 2007. Within and Between Field Movement of Diabrotica barberi and D. virgifera virgifera in the South Dakota Areawide Management Site. Joint meeting of the North Central Branch of the ESA and the Entomological Society of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, March 25-28, 2007.

Technical Abstract: Dispersal is a way insects search for food, shelter, mates, oviposition sites, etc., and can ultimately result in gene flow among populations. We investigated the within and between field movement of Diabrotica barberi Smith and Lawrence and D. virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in the 41.4 km2 South Dakota Corn Rootworm Areawide Management site. These are two economically important pests of maize, Zea maize L., in the U.S. Corn Belt, and D. v. virgifera has become an invasive pest in many countries of Europe. We used emergence cages and Pherocon AM yellow sticky traps to capture these beetles within maize fields, and Pherocon AM yellow sticky traps to capture the beetles between fields of soybean (Glycine max L.), continuous maize, and first-year maize. Diabrotica barberi were captured in high numbers from continuous and first-year maize fields, whereas D. v. virgifera were captured in high numbers only from continuous maize fields. For both species, males began emerging in higher numbers than females early in the season, and then as the season progressed female emergence was greater than male emergence. This capture pattern also is reflected from the sticky traps placed within and between fields. Generally, more beetles of both species were captured between continuous and first-year maize fields then between maize and soybean fields. We discuss our results in relation to corn rootworm biology and areawide pest management.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014