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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SYSTEMATICS OF MOTHS, LEAFHOPPERS, AND TRUE BUGS OF IMPORTANCE TO AGRICULTURAL, FOREST, AND ORNAMENTAL PLANTS Title: Species of Aphomia Hübner and Paralipsa Butler (Pyralidae: Galleriinae) Known to Occur in the United States and Canada and Their Associations with Stored Products and Social Hymenoptera

Authors
item Solis, M
item Metz, Mark

Submitted to: Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 15, 2007
Publication Date: July 15, 2008
Citation: Solis, M.A., Metz, M. 2008. Species of Aphomia Hübner and Paralipsa Butler (Pyralidae: Galleriinae) Known to Occur in the United States and Canada and Their Associations with Stored Products and Social Hymenoptera. Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington. 110(3):679-692.

Interpretive Summary: The snout moths are represented worldwide and include many species that cause millions of dollars in damage to agricultural plant crops, stored products and bee nests. In this paper we clarify the identity, nomenclatural status, and distribution of 5 species that occur in the U.S. We discuss their biological associations with stored products and wasps and bees. The results will be of interest to quarantine personnel at U.S. ports and biodiversity researchers in the U.S. and Canada.

Technical Abstract: The current taxonomic status of the species of Aphomia Hübner and Paralipsa Butler that occur in the United States and Canada is clarified and keys to their identification are provided. A lectotype is designated for Paralipsa decorella (Hulst), which is transferred to Aphomia and treated as a junior synonym of A. terrenella Zeller. Preliminary morphological research indicates that Aphomia fusculimbella Ragonot does not belong in Aphomia as currently defined. Its placement is unknown. Because no other specimens of A. fuscolimbella are known from the Western Hemisphere, the presumed North American origin of this species is considered unlikely. A brief discussion of biological associations is included.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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