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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: BIOLOGICALLY BASED INTEGRATED MANAGEMENT OF WEEDS ON WESTERN RANGELAND WATERSHEDS Title: The role of herbivore-induced plant volatiles in biological control: a journey from lab to field

Authors
item Williams, Livy
item Castle, S - UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO
item Rodriguez-Saona, C - RUDGERS UNIVERSITY
item Zhu, S - UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA
item Montblanc, Eugenie
item Quinlan, Ryan

Submitted to: International Society of Chemical Ecology Meeting
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: May 22, 2007
Publication Date: July 22, 2008
Citation: Williams III, L.H., Castle, S.C., Rodriguez-Saona, C., Zhu, S., Montblanc, E.M., Quinlan, R.M. 2008. The role of herbivore-induced plant volatiles in biological control: a journey from lab to field. International Society of Chemical Ecology Meeting. p. 257.

Technical Abstract: Some plants respond to herbivory by emitting volatiles that attract natural enemies of the herbivores responsible for the damage. Several herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs) are known to affect the behavior of pest and beneficial insects. Thus, chemical signaling by plants in response to herbivore attack has potential for enhancing biological control in agroecosystems. To date, however, little is known about practical application of HIPVs for crop protection. In this poster we report on the neurophysiological and behavioral effects of arthropods in response to several HIPVs. Lygus species (a pest) and A. iole (a natural enemy of Lygus) showed differential responses to HIPVs in electroantennography and behavioral bioassays. In a field study, beneficial insects were attracted to HIPVs and parasitism of Lygus eggs was greater in HIPV treatments than in untreated controls. Our results suggest that HIPVs have potential for enhancing biological control in agroecosystems and underscores the need for further research.

Last Modified: 12/27/2014
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