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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Rice Bran: Production, Composition, Functionality and Food Applications, Physiological Benefits

Author
item Kahlon, Talwinder

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: December 14, 2007
Publication Date: June 1, 2009
Citation: Kahlon, T.S. 2009. Chapter 14: Rice Bran: Production, Composition, Functionality and Food Applications, Physiological Benefits. In: Eds. Cho, S.S. and Samuel, P. Fiber Ingredients Food Applications and Health Benefits. CRC Press. Taylor & Francis Group. 305-321.

Interpretive Summary: Animal and human studies show cholesterol-lowering with rice bran in individuals with high cholesterol. Cholesterol-lowering activity has been associated with rice bran oil, unsaponifiable matter, dietary fiber and protein. Consuming brown rice as a whole grain would be highly desirable. Possible mechanisms for cholesterol-lowering with rice bran include interference with absorption of dietary and fats and increased excretion of bile acids. Inclusion of rice bran in low-fat diets could prove to be healthful for the general population. Commercial interest generated by the health-promoting effects of rice bran has contributed to the introduction of numerous value-added rice bran-containing foods and food products such as breads, breakfast cereals, cakes, cookies, extruded snacks, muffins, pies and snack bars.

Technical Abstract: Animal and human studies show cholesterol-lowering with rice bran in hypercholesterolemic individuals. Specific rice bran fractions showing hypocholesterolemic activity include rice bran oil, unsaponifiable matter, dietary fiber and protein. There is a dose response to the level of rice bran and rice bran oil unsaponifiable matter for cholesterol reductions, but intact full-fat rice bran appears to be the most effective. Consuming brown rice as whole grain would be highly desirable. Possible mechanisms for cholesterol-lowering with rice bran include interference with absorption/reabsorption of dietary and/or endogenous lipid in the gastrointestinal tract and increased excretion of bile acids, which results in utilization of more cholesterol for bile acid synthesis. The concept of a 2% reduction in risk with each 1% reduction in cholesterol in high-risk individuals is well accepted. With reported plasma total and LDL cholesterol reductions of 4-10% in subjects with moderate hypercholesterolemia, inclusion of rice bran with a low-fat diet, could prove to be healthful for the general population. Commercial interest generated by the health effects of rice bran has contributed to the introduction of numerous value-added rice bran-containing foods and food products such as breads, breakfast cereals, cakes, cookies, extruded snacks, muffins, pies and snack bars.

Last Modified: 9/23/2014