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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: EPIDEMIOLOGY, ECOLOGY, AND MOLECULAR GENETICS OF ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE IN PATHOGENIC AND COMMENSAL BACTERIA FROM FOOD ANIMALS Title: Perspective on Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Escherichia coli Isolates Recovered from Poultry Carcass Rinsates as Part of the Animal Arm of NARMS

Authors
item Cray, Paula
item Anandaraman, Neena - USDA-FSIS
item Plumblee, Jodie

Submitted to: National Foundation for Infectious Disease
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: April 17, 2007
Publication Date: June 25, 2007
Citation: Cray, P.J., Anandaraman, N., Plumblee, J. 2007. Perspective on Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Escherichia coli Isolates Recovered from Poultry Carcass Rinsates as Part of the Animal Arm of NARMS. National Foundation for Infectious Disease. S6:39-40.

Technical Abstract: Educational objective: To provide timely information regarding susceptibility trends in generic E. coli originating from poultry carcass rinsates. Escherichia coli are considered commensal intestinal flora in both animals and humans and are known to transfer antimicrobial resistance genes to other bacteria. Consequently, they may play a role in the dissemination of these genes to other food borne bacteria. From 2000 through 2004, E. coli isolates were recovered from chicken carcass rinsates collected at federally inspected slaughter and processing establishments in the U.S. as part of the animal arm of the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System – Enteric Bacteria (NARMS). Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles were determined using broth microdilution (SensititreTM) against a custom made panel of antimicrobials which are important in both human and veterinary medicine. From 2004 to 2006, resistance to ampicillin increased from 17.6% to 25.6% while resistance to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid increased from 8.8% to 16.0%, respectively. Resistance to the cephalosporin, ceftiofur also increased; however, < 1% of isolates exhibited resistance to ceftriaxone. Ceftiofur is only used in veterinary medicine while ceftriaxone is only used in human medicine. In 2006, total percent resistance to kanamycin (9.1%), streptomycin (49.5%), nalidixic acid (5.4%), and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (8.3%) was below levels observed in 2004. The potential for gene transfer associated with these bacteria continues to demonstrate the need for continued susceptibility monitoring of E. coli.

Last Modified: 12/25/2014