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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Evaluation of common bean cultivars from the United States for their reaction to soybean rust under field conditions in Brazil and South Africa

Authors
item Pastor Corrales, Marcial
item Sartorato, A - EMBRADA-BRAZIL
item Liebenberg, M - ARC-SOUTH AFRICA
item Del Peloso, M - EMBRADA-BRAZIL
item Arraes-Pereia, P - EMBRADA-LABEX
item Junior, J - CTPA-BRAZIL
item Campos, H - UFRV-BRAZIL

Submitted to: Bean Improvement Cooperative Annual Report
Publication Type: Trade Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 30, 2007
Publication Date: March 30, 2007
Citation: Pastor Corrales, M.A., Sartorato, A., Liebenberg, M.S., Del Peloso, M.J., Arraes-Pereia, P.A., Junior, J.N., Campos, H.D. 2007. Evaluation of common bean cultivars from the United States for their reaction to soybean rust under field conditions in Brazil and South Africa. Bean Improvement Cooperative Annual Report. 50:123-124.

Technical Abstract: Soybean rust is a new and very severe disease of soybean in the Americas. The pathogen that causes soybean rust is unusual in its host range; in addition to soybeans, it can cause “soybean rust” in snap and dry beans and many other leguminous crops. Very little is known about the capacity of the soybean rust fungus to cause yield losses and other type damage to different dry bean varieties under field conditions. That is why we established a collaborative research endeavor between scientists from ARS, Brazil and South Africa to determine the reaction of different US common bean varieties to a natural infection of the soybean rust pathogen under field conditions of Brazil and South Africa. In Brazil, all common bean cultivars in all three locations tested had very mild soybean rust symptoms compared to the soybean check cultivars that had very severe soybean rust symptoms. In South Africa, the dry bean varieties were planted in rows surrounded by rows of severely infected soybeans; however, all common bean cultivars had various degrees of soybean rust symptoms that were rather mild compared to the very severe symptoms on soybeans. These results suggest that dry beans are at much lower risk than soybeans of suffering a major epidemic caused by soybean rust. These results are important to bean growers in locations where dry bean and soybean are planted in adjacent fields, as it occurs in North Dakota and Michigan, the two largest dry bean producers in the U.S.

Last Modified: 7/22/2014
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