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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Varying Response of Sugar Beet Lines to Different Fusarium Oxysporum F. sp. Betae Isolates from the United States.

Authors
item HANSON, LINDA
item Hill, Amy
item Jacobsen, Barry - MONTANA STATE UNIVERSITY
item PANELLA, LEONARD

Submitted to: Journal of Sugarbeet Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 11, 2009
Publication Date: July 31, 2009
Citation: Hanson, L.E., Hill, A.L., Jacobsen, B.J., Panella, L.W. 2009. Varying Response of Sugar Beet Lines to Different Fusarium Oxysporum F. sp. Betae Isolates from the United States. Journal of Sugarbeet Research. 46(1):11-26.

Interpretive Summary: Nine isolates of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. betae, the cause of Fusarium yellows of sugar beet, were tested for their interaction with different sugar beet lines. In addition, two of these isolates were tested in the presence or absence of the sugarbeet cyst nematode, Heterodera schachtii. Differences were detected in the disease severity on the sugar beet lines by the various isolates in the absence of the cyst nematode. While a small number of lines showed reduced disease with several isolates, for the majority of lines, responses varied, depending upon the pathogen isolate used. The presence of H. schachtii increased disease severity with two isolates of F. oxysporum f.sp. betae for some lines and decreased it with others. Such variability in host response may offer a partial explanation for the variable results growers have reported when planting sugar beet lines with Fusarium yellows resistance. Interpretive summary: Fusarium yellows is a serious disease of sugar beet in many growing areas. The primary control for the disease is host resistance. However sugar beet growers report inconsistent results with some resistant lines. To investigate possible causes, nine isolates of the primary cause, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. betae were inoculated onto different sugar beet lines. In addition, two of these isolates were tested on a subset of the sugar beet lines in the presence of the sugar beet cyst nematode to test for possible interactions with other pests. Some of the sugar beet lines differed significantly in their response to the varying isolates, and the presence of the cyst nematode further altered responses in some lines. Variable resistance to different pathogen isolates, and differing responses to another pest may explain some of the variable responses reported by growers.

Technical Abstract: Nine isolates of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. betae, the cause of Fusarium yellows of sugar beet, were tested for their interaction with different sugar beet lines. In addition, two of these isolates were tested in the presence or absence of the sugarbeet cyst nematode, Heterodera schachtii. Differences were detected in the disease severity on the sugar beet lines by the various isolates in the absence of the cyst nematode. While a small number of lines showed reduced disease with several isolates, for the majority of lines, responses varied, depending upon the pathogen isolate used. The presence of H. schachtii increased disease severity with two isolates of F. oxysporum f.sp. betae for some lines and decreased it with others. Such variability in host response may offer a partial explanation for the variable results growers have reported when planting sugar beet lines with Fusarium yellows resistance. Interpretive summary: Fusarium yellows is a serious disease of sugar beet in many growing areas. The primary control for the disease is host resistance. However sugar beet growers report inconsistent results with some resistant lines. To investigate possible causes, nine isolates of the primary cause, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. betae were inoculated onto different sugar beet lines. In addition, two of these isolates were tested on a subset of the sugar beet lines in the presence of the sugar beet cyst nematode to test for possible interactions with other pests. Some of the sugar beet lines differed significantly in their response to the varying isolates, and the presence of the cyst nematode further altered responses in some lines. Variable resistance to different pathogen isolates, and differing responses to another pest may explain some of the variable responses reported by growers.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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