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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: APPLICATION OF BIOLOGICAL AND MOLECULAR TECHNIQUES TO THE DIAGNOSIS AND CONTROL OF AVIAN INFLUENZA AND OTHER EMERGING POULTRY PATHOGENS

Location: Exotic and Emerging Avian Viral Diseases Research Unit

Title: Chlorine inactivation of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus

Authors
item Rice, Eugene - U.S. EPA
item Adcock, Noreen - U.S. EPA
item Sivaganesan, Mano - U.S. EPA
item Brown, Justin - UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA
item Stallknecht, David - UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA
item Swayne, David

Submitted to: Emerging Infectious Diseases
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: July 10, 2007
Publication Date: October 1, 2007
Citation: Rice, E.W., Adcock, N.J., Sivaganesan, M., Brown, J.D., Stallknecht, D.D., Swayne, D.E. 2007. Chlorine inactivation of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 13(10):1568-1570.

Interpretive Summary: Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses can remain viable in water for extended period of time. Two Asian strains of H5N1 HPAI virus were studied to determine if chlorine levels in municipal drinking water would be effective for killing the viruses. The results confirm that free chlorine concentrations typically used in drinking water treatment would be sufficient to inactivate the virus even at cold temperatures (4 C).

Technical Abstract: Two Asian strains of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus were studied to determine their resistance to chlorination. Experiments were conducted at two pH levels (pH 7 and 8) at 5 C. CT (chlorine concentration x exposure time) values were calculated for different levels of inactivation. Results confirm that free chlorine concentrations typically used in drinking water treatment would be sufficient to inactivate the virus.

Last Modified: 10/1/2014
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