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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Genotype analysis of Campylobacter spp. isolated from various internal organs and unabsorbed yolks of commercial broiler chickens

Authors
item Hiett, Kelli
item Buhr, Richard
item Cox, Nelson
item Richardson, Larry
item Cray, Paula
item Bailey, Joseph
item Northcutt, Julie

Submitted to: Poultry Science Association Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: March 15, 2007
Publication Date: July 8, 2007
Citation: Hiett, K.L., Buhr, R.J., Cox Jr, N.A., Richardson, L.J., Cray, P.J., Bailey, J.S., Northcutt, J.K. 2007. Genotype analysis of Campylobacter spp. isolated from various internal organs and unabsorbed yolks of commercial broiler chickens [abstract]. Poultry Science Association Meeting Abstract. Poultry Science. 86(Suppl. 1)M274. 90.

Technical Abstract: Campylobacter spp. are presently believed to be the leading bacterial etiological agent of acute gastroenteritis in the human population. Evidence implicates poultry as a significant source of the organism for human illness; however, the pathways involved in Campylobacter spp. contamination of poultry flocks remain unclear. In an effort to further understand the dissemination of naturally occurring Campylobacter spp. through commercial broiler and roaster chickens, Campylobacter jejuni isolates previously recovered from the liver/gallbladder, spleen, ceca, and unabsorbed yolks of broiler and roaster chickens were genotyped using flagellinA Short Variable Region (flaA-SVR) DNA sequence analysis. All isolates recovered from broilers were of one flaA-SVR subtype regardless of the site of recovery. Isolates recovered from roasters comprised two subtypes. The predominant subtype (flaA-SVR type 1) contained isolates recovered from all locations tested. Additionally, this same flaA-SVR subtype was recovered from both broilers and roasters. This investigation demonstrated that very closely related subtypes of C. jejuni were naturally present within the internal organs and unabsorbed yolks of commercial broilers and roasters from different flocks, companies, and breeder strains. Further investigations of these subtypes are needed to understand their involvement in intestinal tract microbiology and the subsequent contamination of the final food product.

Last Modified: 9/20/2014
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