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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Effects of microbial inoculants on soil microbial activity, bacterial populations, and diseases suppressiveness

Authors
item Burkett-Cadena, Marleny - AUBURN UNIVERSITY
item Burelle, Nancy
item Lawrence, Kathy - AUBURN UNIVERSITY
item Kloepper, Joseph - AUBURN UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Phytopathology
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: January 8, 2007
Publication Date: February 1, 2007
Citation: Burkett-Cadena, M., Burelle, N.K., Lawrence, K., Kloepper, J.W. 2007. Effects of microbial inoculants on soil microbial activity, bacterial populations, and diseases suppressiveness. Phytopathology.

Interpretive Summary: Among the various management options for root knot nematodes, are inducing soil suppressiveness by microorganisms. Induction of soil suppressiveness by commercially-available microbial inoculants (Bioyield and FZB42) and the relation to microbial activity and population size were studied. Tomato seedlings were first inoculated with microbial inoculants and then challenged with Meloidogyne incognita race 3 eggs. Results showed significant reductions in numbers of nematode eggs per gram of root, numbers of juveniles per ml, and numbers of galls in Bioyield and FZB42 treatments. Additionally, increases in bacterial population size were detected by direct plate counting, although there was no correlation between microbial activity detected by Fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis and population size. These results indicated that selected microbial inoculants colonize the root system, establish stable populations, and thereby can be used to induce suppressiveness to soilborne pathogens.

Technical Abstract: Among the various management options for root knot nematodes, are inducing soil suppressiveness by microorganisms. Induction of soil suppressiveness by commercially-available microbial inoculants (Bioyield and FZB42) and the relation to microbial activity and population size were studied. Tomato seedlings were first inoculated with microbial inoculants and then challenged with Meloidogyne incognita race 3 eggs. Results showed significant reductions in numbers of nematode eggs per gram of root, numbers of juveniles per ml, and numbers of galls in Bioyield and FZB42 treatments. Additionally, increases in bacterial population size were detected by direct plate counting, although there was no correlation between microbial activity detected by Fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis and population size. These results indicated that selected microbial inoculants colonize the root system, establish stable populations, and thereby can be used to induce suppressiveness to soilborne pathogens.

Last Modified: 8/29/2014
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