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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Status of the fire ant decapitating fly Pseudacteon tricuspis (Diptera: Phoridae) in Louisiana

Authors
item Henne, Donald - LOUISIANA STATE UNIV.
item Johnson, Seth - LOUISIANA STATE UNIV.
item Porter, Sanford

Submitted to: Florida Entomologist
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: August 2, 2007
Publication Date: October 1, 2007
Citation: Henne, D.C., Johnson, S.J., Porter, S.D. 2007. Status of the fire ant decapitating fly Pseudacteon tricuspis (Diptera: Phoridae) in Louisiana. Florida Entomologist.90(3):565-569.

Interpretive Summary: Scientists in the Department of Entomology at Louisiana State University and the USDA-ARS Center for Medical, Agricultural and Vetenary Entomology conducted eight releases of the South American fire ant decapitating fly, Pseudacteon tricuspis Borgmeier, in Louisiana from 1999 to 2006. Although this fly was initially recaptured at 88% of the release sites, four of the releases ultimately failed so long-term establishment was only 43%. Fly populations from two releases have expanded out 50-80 km from their release sites (Fall 2006). This paper is important because it shows that this fire ant biocontrol agent is now firmly established across large areas in Louisiana.

Technical Abstract: The fire ant decapitating fly Pseudacteon tricuspis is a potential self-sustaining or classical biological control agent for red imported fire ants in the United States which currently lack effective natural enemies. Scientists in the Department of Entomology at Louisiana State University and the USDA-ARS Center for Medical, Agricultural and Vetenary Entomology in Gainesville, Florida conducted eight releases of the South American fire ant decapitating fly P. tricuspis in Louisiana from 1999 to 2006. Although this fly was initially recaptured at 88% of the release sites, four of the releases ultimately failed so long-term establishment was only 43%. Fly populations from two releases have expanded out 50-80 km from their release sites (Fall 2006). This paper is important because it shows that this fire ant biocontrol agent is now firmly established across large areas in Louisiana.

Last Modified: 10/1/2014
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