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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Comparison of ASTER, MASTER, and ground-based hyperspectral reflectance measurements

Authors
item Ritchie, Jerry
item Schmugge, Thomas - NEW MEXICO STATE UNIV.
item Rango, Albert - USDA ARS JORNADA

Submitted to: International Association of Hydrological Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 5, 2007
Publication Date: July 15, 2007
Citation: Ritchie, J.C., Schmugge, T.J., Hsu, A., and Rango, A. 2007. Comparison of ASTER, MASTER, and ground-based hyperspectral reflectance measurements. In: M. Owe and C. Neale (eds.), Remote Sensing for Environmental Monitoring and Change Detection, IAHS Publication 316, IAHS Press, Wallingford, UK. p. 237-244

Interpretive Summary: A comparison of reflectance measured in the visible, near infrared, and short wave infrared wavelengths by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), MODIS/ASTER Airborne Simulator (MASTER), and ground based Analytical Spectral Devices Spectroradiometer (ASD) for three different vegetation communities (grass, transition, and shrub) and three different dates (May 2001, October 2002, and May 2003) in a semiarid rangeland of southern New Mexico found a strong positive relationship between the reflectance measurements of three sensors. This indicates that the three sensors were measuring similar reflectance values for the three different dates and three different vegetation communities. Reflectance was highest from the communities with low vegetation cover (shrub and shrub-grass transition) communities and lowest from the communities with higher vegetation cover (grass) indicating a strong relationship with the amount of ground (vegetation) cover present and reflectance. This has implications for the energy and water budgets in this region of the Chihuahuan desert where shrub communities with low ground cover are invading and replacing grass communities. These increases in the surface reflectance, as the grass communities (higher cover) are invaded by shrub communities (lower cover), could have potential effects on global climates.

Technical Abstract: This study compares reflectance measured in the visible, near infrared, and short wave infrared wavelengths by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), MODIS/ASTER Airborne Simulator (MASTER), and ground based Analytical Spectral Devices Spectroradiometer (ASD) in a semiarid area of the northern Chihuahuan desert in southern New Mexico USA. This study provided a unique opportunity to compare remote sensing data collected for semiarid rangelands from different platforms, at different scales, and in different plant communities. ASD visible, near infrared, and shortwave infrared reflectance data (0.35 to 2.5 mm) for May 12, 2001, October 6, 2002, and May 2, 2003 were analyzed and integrated to match 21 MASTER and 9 ASTER bandwidths for three different vegetation communities (shrub, grass, and shrub-grass transition) and compared to MASTER and ASTER reflectance data collected for the same dates. A strong positive correlation between the measurements indicated that the three sensors were measuring similar reflectance values for the three dates and vegetation communities. Reflectance was highest from the shrub and shrub-grass transition communities and lowest from the grass community and was related to the amount of vegetation cover present. This has implications for the energy and water budgets in this region of the Chihuahuan desert where shrub communities with low ground cover are invading and replacing grass communities.

Last Modified: 12/20/2014
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