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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: BIOLOGICALLY BASED WEED MANAGEMENT: FUNDAMENTAL RESEARCH ON DORMANCY AND THE GENETICS OF WEEDS Title: Heterologous hybridization of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum)microarrays with Velvetleaf (Abutilon theophrasti) reveals physiological responses due to corn competition

Authors
item Horvath, David
item Llewellyn, Danny - CSIRO PLANT INDUSTRY
item Clay, Sharon - SOUTH DAKOTA STATE UNIV

Submitted to: Weed Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 14, 2007
Publication Date: November 1, 2007
Citation: Horvath, D.P., Llewellyn, D., Clay, S.A. 2007. Heterologous hybridization of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum)microarrays with Velvetleaf (Abutilon theophrasti) reveals physiological responses due to corn competition. Weed Science. 55:546-557. DOI:10.1614/WS-07-008.1.

Interpretive Summary: Use of genomics based tools such as microarray analysis is difficult when studying non model plants such as weeds. Additionally such tools are extremely useful to ascertain physiological responses of such weeds to competition with crops. We have shown that cotton microarrays can be used to study changes in gene expression associated with corn competition in the annual broad-leafed weed velvetleaf.

Technical Abstract: Microarray analysis was used to identify changes in gene expression in velvetleaf that result from competition with corn. The plants were grown in field plots under adequate N (addition of 220 kg N ha-1) to minimize stress and sampled at the V6 growth stage of corn (late June). Leaf area, dry weight, and N and P concentration were similar in velvetleaf plants grown alone or with corn. Competition, however, did influence velvetleaf gene expression. Genes involved in carbon utilization, photosynthesis, red light signaling, and cell division were induced when velvetleaf was grown in competition with corn. A less clear picture of the physiological impact of growth in monoculture was provided by the data. However, several genes involved in secondary metabolism and a gene induced by phosphate availability were induced. No differences were observed in genes responsive to water stress or sequestering/transporting.

Last Modified: 4/17/2014
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