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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SUCROSE ACCUMULATION AND RETENTION IN SUGARBEETS Title: Impact of Rhizomania on Storage Respiration Rate and Sugar Loss

Authors
item Campbell, Larry
item Fugate, Karen

Submitted to: Sugarbeet Research and Extension Reports
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: January 16, 2007
Publication Date: January 29, 2007
Citation: Campbell, L.G., Klotz, K.L. 2007. Impact of Rhizomania on Storage Respiration Rate and Sugar Loss. 2006 Sugarbeet Research and Extension Reports, Cooperative Extension Service, North Dakota State University. 37:107-109.

Interpretive Summary: During the past decade, rhizomania, a virus disease, has become a serious threat to sugarbeet production in Minnesota and eastern North Dakota. As the prevalence and severity of the disease increased, the proportion of roots from fields with the disease that were placed in postharvest storage piles also increased. This raised concerns among processors regarding the storage of roots from areas where the disease was widespread. This report provides information on the storability of diseased roots that will assist in making decisions that will minimize postharvest sugar losses. Roots with and without the diseases were stored for up to 120 days after harvest during which time storage respiration rate and sugar loss were measured. The sugar loss attributable to rhizomania varied considerably from year to year but it was apparent that the potential loss from storing diseases roots is substantial. Rhizomania resistant varieties are the most effective method of reducing these losses and if diseased roots are harvested they should be processed as soon as possible.

Technical Abstract: Rhizomania, (beet necrotic yellow vein virus) is a serious threat to sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris) production in Minnesota and eastern North Dakota. As the prevalence and severity of the disease has increased, the proportion of diseased roots placed in postharvest storage piles also has increased. This report provides information on the storability of diseased roots that will assist in making decisions that will minimize postharvest sugar losses. Roots with and without the diseases were stored for up to 120 days after harvest during which time storage respiration rate and sugar loss were measured. The sugar loss attributable to rhizomania varied considerably from year to year but it was apparent that the potential loss from storing diseases roots is substantial. In one year of the 3-year trial, diseased roots lost more than half of the sugar they had at harvest; healthy roots lost less than 10% of their sugar during 120 days in storage. Rhizomania resistant varieties are the most effective method of reducing these losses and if diseased roots are harvested they should be processed as soon as possible.

Last Modified: 12/19/2014
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