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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: INVASION BIOLOGY OF INVASIVE SPECIES: BIOCONTROL AND RELATED TECHNOLOGIES FOR EXOTIC INSECT PESTS, WITH EMPHASIS ON ASIAN LONGHORNED BEETLE Title: Research Update: Detection and Monitoring of the Asian Longhorned Beetle: Sentinel Trees, Attract-and-Kill and Artificial Lure

Authors
item Smith, Michael
item Wu, Jinquan - UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE
item He, W - CHINESE ACADEMY
item X, Xu - CHINESE ACADEMY
item Gries, G - SIMON FRASER UNIV BURNABY
item Gries, R - SIMON FRASER UNIV BURNABY
item Borden, J - PHEROTECH INC BURNABY
item Turgeon, J - CANADIAN FOREST SERVICE
item Groot, P DE - CANADIAN FOREST SERVICE

Submitted to: Proceedings of the Emerald Ash Borer and Asian Longhorned Beetle Research and Development Review 2006
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: January 21, 2007
Publication Date: March 20, 2007
Citation: Smith, M.T., Wu, J., He, W., X, X., Gries, G., Gries, R., Borden, J.H., Turgeon, J.J., Groot, P. 2007. Research Update: Detection and Monitoring of the Asian Longhorned Beetle: Sentinel Trees, Attract-and-Kill and Artificial Lure. Proceedings of the Emerald Ash Borer and Asian Longhorned Beetle Research and Development Review 2006. USDA Forest Service. FHTET-2007-04. p. 104-105.

Interpretive Summary: Asian Longhorned Beetle, (ALB), is among high risk invasive species that recently invaded the U.S. from China, with infestations in New York City and Long Island, NY, Chicago, IL, Jersey City, Carteret and Linden, NJ, and Toronto, Canada. ALB has attacked 25 deciduous tree species in 13 genera in N.A., most notable seven maple species. ALB is currently limited in distribution and thus the focus is on eradication. Eradication is dependent upon its detection of ALB. Thus, the objectives of studies reported here include: (1) to identify tree species that could be used as sentinel trees and (2) to identify and develop an artificial attractant. To date, results from field studies have shown that: (1) Shantung maple is significantly more attractive than: (a) the other known host groups in China, (b) Norway maple, the key maple species attacked in the U.S., and (c) a sister maple species of Shantung maple in China. (2) Attraction to Shantung maple is significantly increased by wounding, and attraction consistently shows a female bias, both indicative of response to host odors. (3) Shantung maple is attractive during peak and declining populations. (4) Shantung maple capable of attracting adult beetles out of large landscape Manitoba maple trees. These results provide methods for detection and/or monitoring of adult ALB. Results from chemical and behavioral analysis of volatiles collected from Shantung maple have identified Shantung maple volatiles that are detected and attractive to ALB, particularly female beetles.

Technical Abstract: Asian Longhorned Beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis (ALB), is among high risk invasive species that recently invaded the U.S. from China, with infestations in New York City and Long Island, NY, Chicago, IL, Jersey City, Carteret and Linden, NJ, and Toronto, Canada. ALB has attacked 25 deciduous tree species in 13 genera in N.A., most notable seven maple species. ALB is currently limited in distribution and thus the focus is on eradication. Eradication is dependent upon its detection of ALB. Thus, the objectives of studies reported here include: (1) to identify tree species that could be used as sentinel trees and (2) to identify and develop an artificial lure. To date, results from field studies have shown that: (1) Acer mono is significantly more attractive than: (a) Tilia, Eleagnus, Salix, Populus, the other known host genera in China, (b) Acer platanoides, the key maple species attacked in the U.S., and (c) Acer truncatum, a sister species of A. mono in China. (2) Attraction to A. mono is significantly increased by wounding, and attraction consistently shows a female bias, both indicative of response to host odors. (3) A. mono is attractive during peak and declining populations. (4) A. mono capable of attracting adult beetles out of large landscape Acer negundo trees. These results provide methods for detection and/or monitoring of adult ALB. Results from GC-EAD and olfactometer lab studies have identified A. mono host volatiles that are detected and attractive to ALB, particularly female beetles.

Last Modified: 12/22/2014
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