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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: INVASION BIOLOGY OF INVASIVE SPECIES: BIOCONTROL AND RELATED TECHNOLOGIES FOR EXOTIC INSECT PESTS, WITH EMPHASIS ON ASIAN LONGHORNED BEETLE

Location: Beneficial Insects Introduction Research

Title: Research on Asian longhorned beetle in Canada

Authors
item Turgeon, Jean - NATURAL RESOURCES CANADA
item Gasman, Ben - CANADIAN FOOD INSPECTION
item Smith, Michael
item Grott, Peter DE - NATURAL RESOURCES CANADA
item Helson, Blair - NATURAL RESOURCES CANADA
item Thompson, Dean - NATURAL RESOURCES CANADA
item Abou-Zaid, Mamdouh - NATURAL RESOURCES CANADA
item Kreutzweizer, Dave - NATURAL RESOURCES CANADA

Submitted to: Proceedings of the Emerald Ash Borer and Asian Longhorned Beetle Research and Development Review 2006
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 18, 2006
Publication Date: March 20, 2007
Citation: Turgeon, J.J., Gasman, B., Smith, M.T., Grott, P., Helson, B., Thompson, D., Abou-Zaid, M., Kreutzweizer, D. 2007. Research on Asian longhorned beetle in Canada. Proceedings of the Emerald Ash Borer and Asian Longhorned Beetle Research and Development Review 2006. USDA Forest Service. FHTET-2007-04. p. 101-102.

Interpretive Summary: An established population of the Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) was discovered in Toronto, Ontario, Canada in 2003. ALB posses an enormous risk to the maple forests of southern Canada and northern U.S. Therefore, eradication and research programs were integrated to eradicate ALB, to develop improved survey, detection and control strategies, and to model the process of invasion biology. The two programs, conducted concurrently, allowed the Research Program to provide new information to the Eradication Program on a timely basis to improve the probability of successful eradication. Eradication of ALB in Canada consisted of removing and chipping all trees at risk of attack that were within 400m of a known infested tree. All infested trees were dissected and critical data collected. Results from data analysis is providing new information on what landscapes and tree species are at greatest risk of attack and where within trees ALB initially attacks. Collectively, this is improving the efficiency of detection of infested trees. This enables the early detection of: (1) existing infestations that are subsequently eradicated, and (2) new introductions that are eliminated to prevent subsequent establishment of new infestations. Results from data analysis will also lead to development of an empirical model of the process of invasion that will have broad application in the increasingly important field of invasion biology. Research results are also presented from initial studies of the systemic insecticide imidacloprid to mitigate the increased risk of dispersal to un-infested areas by residual populations within the infested area.

Technical Abstract: An established population of the Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) (Anoplophora glabripennis) (Motschulsky) was discovered in 2003 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Given the enormous risk that ALB posses to the expansive forests of southern Canada and northern U.S. and the urgent need to eradicate ALB, as well as the need to development of improved survey, detection and control strategies, integrated eradication and research programs were implemented. The two programs, conducted concurrently, allowed the Research Program to provide new information to the Eradication Program on a timely basis, thereby improving the probability of successful eradication. Eradication of ALB in Canada consists of removing and chipping all trees at risk of attack located within 400m of an infested tree. All trees were identified to species and geo-referenced prior to removal. Infested trees returned to the laboratory were cut into 50 cm bolts and each bolt examined. Attack density and characteristics were quantified. Year of attack was also determined using dendrological methods. Collectively, information on host suitability, larval behavior, within-tree colonization patterns, dispersal patterns among trees in the landscape and molecular relatedness of beetle was collected from the over 500 landscape trees found to be infested among the 25,000 trees removed. Although data analysis has not been completed, results are expected to lead to improved detection, sampling and control methods, local and site-specific survey, detection and treatment recommendations, and increased survey accuracy. The spatial temporal data will result in an empirical model of the process of invasion that will have broad application in the increasingly important field of invasion biology.

Last Modified: 4/17/2014
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