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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Comparison of Nitrogen Fertilizers: Effects on Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.) Grown for Seed

Authors
item Griffith, Stephen
item Murray, G - UNIV OF IDAHO

Submitted to: Seed Production Research at Oregon State University
Publication Type: Experiment Station
Publication Acceptance Date: March 31, 2006
Publication Date: April 30, 2006
Citation: Griffith, S.M., Murray, G.A. 2006. Comparison of Nitrogen Fertilizers: Effects on Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.) Grown for Seed. Seed Production Research at Oregon State University. EXT/CrS 125, 4/06 pages 75-79.

Interpretive Summary: The agriculture fertilizer, ammonium nitrate, is no longer available due to national security concerns for improper use. The lack of availability of this fertilizer has created a need for alternative nitrogen sources for commercial grass seed production. This study evaluated alternative forms of nitrogen fertilizer for Kentucky bluegrass seed production. Different nitrogen fertilizers were used at different sites to determine their suitability as an alternative to ammonium nitrate. This work showed that alternative sources including calcium nitrate and ammonium sulfate provided seed yields equivalent to those produced by ammonium sulfate. The enhanced ammonium fertilizers had the additional benefit of reduced leaching.

Technical Abstract: Ammonium nitrate is no longer available for agricultural fertilizer use due to national security concerns. The lack of availability of this fertilizer has created a need for alternative nitrogen sources for commercial grass seed production. This study evaluated alternative forms of nitrogen fertilizer for Kentucky bluegrass seed production utilizing different cultivars produced at different locations. Nitrate, ammonium and urea forms of nitrogen fertilizers were evaluated for their impact on seed yield and plant development. Alternative sources including calcium nitrate and ammonium sulfate provided seed yields equivalent to those produced by ammonium sulfate. Enhanced ammonium fertilizers had the additional benefit of reduced leaching.

Last Modified: 9/3/2014
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