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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Detecting Water Stress in Cotton Under Different Production Systems

Authors
item Sassenrath, Gretchen
item THOMSON, STEVEN

Submitted to: Agronomy Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: November 4, 2006
Publication Date: November 4, 2006
Citation: Sassenrath, G.F., Thomson, S.J. 2006. Detecting Water Stress in Cotton Under Different Production Systems. Agronomy Society of America, Annual Meeting. 4-8 November, 2006. Indianapolis, IN. 61-8, 2123a.

Interpretive Summary: One potential benefit of incorporating cover crops into reduced tillage systems is an increase in soil water available for production of the cash crop. We are exploring methods to detect the onset of water stress in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. sps.) under conventional and conservation production systems for better timing of supplemental irrigation. In this study, we explored the soil and crop water status for two production systems, conventional (subsoiled, no cover crop) and conservation (no subsoiling, winter wheat cover crop). Differences in soil moisture were observed. Substantial differences in crop canopy were observed with thermal images. While some differences in crop canopy reflectance in the visible regions were observed, the differences were inconclusive for delineating differences between the canopies. Yield limitations were observed for the non-irrigated crops during the dry 2006 growing season.

Technical Abstract: Conservation production systems alter the soil water availability. Our research is focused on developing methods to detect the onset of water stress in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. sps). In this study, we examined soil and plant water status in a conventional (subsoiled, no cover crop) and a conservation (no subsoiling, winter wheat cover crop) system two soil types common to the Mississippi Delta. Direct measurements of leaf water potentials were correlated with infrared thermometer measures of leaf temperature, and hyperspectral radiances in the near to mid-infrared ranges. These will be useful in developing remote methods of detecting crop water stress for irrigation scheduling.

Last Modified: 9/29/2014
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