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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SURVEILLANCE AND ECOLOGY OF MOSQUITO, BITING AND FILTH BREEDING INSECTS

Location: Mosquito and Fly Research Unit

Title: Long-term surveillance data and patterns of invasion by Aedes albopictus in Florida

Authors
item Britch, Seth
item Linthicum, Kenneth
item Anyamba, Assaf - NASA - GODDARD SPACE FLIG
item Tucker, Compton - NASA - GODDARD SPACE FLIG
item Pak, Ed - NASA - GODDARD SPACE FLIG
item Mosq. Surveillance, Team - LAKE COUNTY MOSQ - FL
item Mosq. Surveillance, Team - MANATEE COUNTY MOSQ - FL
item Mosq. Surveillance, Team - PASCO COUNTY MOSQ - FL
item Mosq. Surveillance, Team - SARASOTA COUNTY MOSQ - FL

Submitted to: American Mosquito Control Association
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: November 10, 2007
Publication Date: March 1, 2008
Citation: Britch, S.C., Linthicum, K., Anyamba, A., Tucker, C.J., Pak, E., Mosq. Surveillance, T., Mosq. Surveillance, T., Mosq. Surveillance, T., Mosq. Surveillance, T. 2008. Long-term surveillance data and patterns of invasion by Aedes albopictus in Florida. American Mosquito Control Association. 24(1):115-120.

Interpretive Summary: Invasive species displacing or augmenting related native species is not only an ecological concern. In the case of newly arriving insects such as exotic species of mosquitoes capable of transmitting existing or emerging diseases, invasive species are also a concern to public and animal health. Using mosquito surveillance data collected by four Florida county mosquito control districts over a 20 year period we chart the arrival of a new mosquito species, Aedes albopictus, the Asian tiger mosquito, and the concurrent demise of a similar related species Aedes aegypti. Although this invasion is well documented our long-term perspective is new, and we have combined it with climate data which suggest that rainfall as well as human activity in response to dry times may have a complex relationship with interspecific competition in limiting or enhancing invading species. We also discuss the relative role of urban versus rural habitat in the invasion process for these two species.

Technical Abstract: We used GIS and long-term mosquito surveillance data from Lake County, Pasco County, Manatee County, and Sarasota County, Florida to look at patterns of invasion by Aedes albopictus with respect to changes in populations of resident Aedes aegypti. We investigated associations of rainfall with changes in populations of these species using satellite climate data. Although Ae. aegypti densities were rapidly attenuated following the arrival of Ae. albopictus in most counties, both species appeared to persist in equilibrium in one county. We discuss the relative importance of rainfall, human-mediated container habitat, and proximity to urban areas.

Last Modified: 7/22/2014