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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Control of stripe rusts of wheat and barley

Authors
item Chen, Xianming
item Wood, David
item Penman, L - WASHINGTON STATE UNIV
item Liu, L - WASHINGTON STATE UNIV
item Yan, Y - WASHINGTON STATE UNIV
item Wang, G - WASHINGTON STATE UNIV
item Lin, F - WASHINGTON STATE UNIV

Submitted to: Washington State University College of Agriculture and Home Economics
Publication Type: Research Notes
Publication Acceptance Date: May 1, 2006
Publication Date: July 1, 2006
Citation: Chen, X., Wood, D.A., Penman, L., Liu, L., Yan, Y.M., Wang, G.P., Lin, F. 2006. Control of stripe rusts of wheat and barley. Highlights of Research Progress, Washington State University College of Ag and Home Economics, Dept of Crop & Soil Sciences, pg 26.

Interpretive Summary: Stripe rusts of wheat and barley were accurately predicted. Fungicide application was implemented to control stripe rust on both winter and spring wheat crops, which prevented major losses. A total of 27 races of the wheat stripe rust pathogen and 15 races of the barley stripe rust pathogen were detected, of which six and two races were new for the wheat and barley stripe rust pathogens, respectively. Predominant races were determined. More than 16,000 wheat and 5,000 barley entries were evaluated for stripe rust resistance, from which new germplasms and advanced breeding lines with stripe rust resistance were identified. The information was provided to breeding programs for developing and releasing new cultivars with adequate resistance. Molecular markers were identified for genes conferring HTAP resistance in Alpowa wheat and Bancroft barley, which are useful for developing resistant cultivars. Genes that are important for rust development, survival, and virulences were identified in the wheat stripe rust pathogen, which leads to a better understanding of the pathogen. New effective fungicides were tested for control of stripe rust.

Technical Abstract: In 2005, stripe rust of wheat was the most widespread in the U.S. and also occurred unusually early and severe in the PNW. Barley stripe rust occurred in the western U.S. and was severe in some fields grown with susceptible cultivars. Stripe rusts of wheat and barley were accurately predicted. Fungicide application was implemented to control stripe rust on both winter and spring wheat crops, which prevented major losses. A total of 27 races of the wheat stripe rust pathogen and 15 races of the barley stripe rust pathogen were detected, of which six and two races were new for the wheat and barley stripe rust pathogens, respectively. PST-100 was the most predominant race of the wheat stripe rust pathogen in the PNW and throughout the country. Wheat stripe rust races PST-115 and PST-116 were increasing in frequency, which rendered several previously resistant cultivars to become susceptible. More than 16,000 wheat and 5,000 barley entries were evaluated for stripe rust resistance, from which new germplasms and advanced breeding lines with stripe rust resistance were identified. The information was provided to breeding programs for developing and releasing new cultivars with adequate resistance. Molecular markers were identified for genes conferring HTAP resistance in Alpowa wheat and Bancroft barley, which are useful for developing resistant cultivars. Genes that are important for rust development, survival, and virulences were identified in the wheat stripe rust pathogen, which leads to a better understanding of the pathogen. These genes were used to design primers for identifying markers for studying the distribution, migration, population structures, and virulence variations of the stripe rust pathogen. New effective fungicides were tested for control of stripe rust. Profitability of fungicide application on various cultivars of wheat and barley without and with different level of stripe rust resistance was determined.

Last Modified: 7/28/2014
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