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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Amphetamine-Induced Taste Aversion Learning in Young and Old F-344 Rats Following Exposure to 56Fe Particles

Authors
item Carrihill-Knoll, K - UMBC
item Rabin, B - UMBC
item Shukitt-Hale, Barbara
item Joseph, James
item Carey, A - NORTHEASTERN

Submitted to: Age
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 27, 2007
Publication Date: May 3, 2007
Citation: Carrihill-Knoll, K.L., Rabin, B.M., Shukitt Hale, B., Joseph, J.A., Carey, A. 2007. Amphetamine-Induced Taste Aversion Learning in Young and Old F-344 Rats Following Exposure to 56Fe Particles. Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior. 29(2):69-76.

Interpretive Summary: Exposure to iron particles produces changes in the functioning of a specific brain system and in behaviors dependent on that system, including amphetamine-induced conditioned taste aversion (CTA) learning, a learned response to avoid an unpleasant consequence (amphetamine). Rats learn to subsequently avoid a sugar solution paired with an injection of amphetamine that made them sick. Because many of these changes are characteristic of the changes that accompany the aging process, the present study was designed to determine whether or not there would be an interaction between age and exposure to iron particles in the disruption of the CTA. One hundred and forty male rats, 2, 7, 12, and 16 months old were radiated with various doses of iron particles. Three days following irradiation, the rats were tested for the effects of radiation by injection of amphetamine and subsequent learning of a CTA. The effect of age was to produce a significant decrease in conditioning day sugar intake without affecting the learning of the amphetamine-induced CTA. Exposing rats to iron particles disrupted the learning of the CTA produced by injection of amphetamine only in the 2-month old rats. The results do not support the hypothesis of an interaction between age and exposure to iron particles in producing a disruption of amphetamine-induced CTA learning. These results suggest that the aging produced by exposure to iron particles may be dependent on the specific endpoint being considered.

Technical Abstract: Exposure to 56Fe particles produces changes in dopaminergic function and in dopamine dependent behaviors, including amphetamine-induced conditioned taste aversion (CTA) learning. Because many of these changes are characteristic of the changes that accompany the aging process, the present study was designed to determine whether or not there would be an interaction between age and exposure to 56Fe particles in the disruption of an amphetamine-induced CTA. One hundred and forty F-344 male rats 2, 7, 12, and 16 months old, were radiated with doses of 56Fe particles (0.25-2.00 Gy, 1 GeV/n) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Three days following irradiation, the rats were tested for the effects of radiation on the acquisition of a CTA produced by injection of amphetamine (3 mg/kg, ip). The effect of age was to produce a significant decrease in conditioning day sucrose intake without affecting the acquisition of the amphetamine-induced CTA. Exposing rats to 56Fe particles disrupted the acquisition of the CTA produced by injection of amphetamine only in the 2-month old rats. These results do not support the hypothesis of an interaction between age and exposure to 56Fe particles in producing a disruption of amphetamine-induced CTA learning. As such, these results suggest that the aging produced by exposure to 56Fe particles may be endpoint specific.

Last Modified: 11/27/2014
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