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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: INTERACTIONS OF CLIMATE CHANGE AND OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS ON INVASIVE PLANT INFESTATION IN THE ARID WEST Title: The high water-holding capacity of petrocalcic horizons

Authors
item Duniway, M - NEW MEXICO STATE UNIV
item Herrick, Jeffrey
item Monger, H - NEW MEXICO STATE UNIV

Submitted to: Soil Science Society of America Journal
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: November 22, 2006
Publication Date: May 1, 2007
Citation: Duniway, M., Herrick, J.E., Monger, H.C. 2007. The high water-holding capacity of petrocalcic horizons. Soil Science Society of America Journal. 71:812-819.

Interpretive Summary: We conducted a replicated experiment to measure the available water holding capacity (AWHC) for a range of petrocalcic horizon materials. Samples from both plugged and laminar zones of two well developed petrocalcic horizons in southern New Mexico were characterized. Cementation by calcium carbonate dramatically alters the water holding characteristics of soils and understanding these horizons is crucial to understand patterns of soil-water in desert systems throughout the world.

Technical Abstract: Petrocalcic soil horizons occur in most arid and semi-arid ecosystems around the world, often within the plant rooting zone. Little is known, however, about the water holding characteristic of soils indurated with calcium carbonate. We conducted a replicated experiment to define the soil-water release curve (SWRC) for a range of petrocalcic horizon materials. Samples from both plugged and laminar zones of two stage V petrocalcic horizons in southern New Mexico were characterized. Wetter soil-water potentials were measured using a pressure plate; more negative potentials (down to < –10 MPa) were measured using a chilled mirror water activity meter. Measured SWRC data were fitted to the Van Genuchten equation. The SWRC methods used were found to be both reliable and repeatable. Plant available water holding capacity (AWHC) for desert species (with wilting point set at –4.0 MPa)ranged from 0.26 m3 m-3 in plugged zones to 0.06 m3 m-3 in some laminar zones in contrast to ~ 0.07 m3 m-3 in the loamy sand parent material. Correlation analyses across morphologies of AWHC and soil properties resulted in significant statistical relationships only with bulk density and porosity. AWHC and calcium carbonate content, however, were significantly negatively correlated within the laminar and positively correlated within the plugged petrocalcic horizon morphologies. Cementation by calcium carbonate dramatically alters the water holding characteristics of soils and understanding these horizons is crucial to understand patterns of soil-water in desert systems throughout the world.

Last Modified: 11/28/2014
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