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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: PLANT RESISTANCE, BIOLOGY, AND RESISTANCE MANAGEMENT OF INSECT PESTS OF CORN Title: Registration of the maize germplasm CRW3(S1)C6 with resistance to western corn rootworm

Authors
item Hibbard, Bruce
item Willmot, David - AGILENT TECHNOLOGIES
item Flint-Garcia, Sherry
item Darrah, Larry

Submitted to: Journal of Plant Registrations
Publication Type: Germplasm Release
Publication Acceptance Date: February 27, 2007
Publication Date: September 1, 2007
Citation: Hibbard, B.E., Willmot, D., Flint Garcia, S.A., Darrah, L.L. Registration of the maize germplasm CRW3(S1)C6 with resistance to western corn rootworm. Journal of Plant Registrations. 1(2):151-152.

Interpretive Summary: The western corn rootworm (WCR) is a major insect pest in continuous corn production. By feeding on corn roots, WCR causes economic losses due to plant lodging and decreased nutrient uptake, both resulting in yield loss. Currently, insecticides and transgenic corn are the only available options for its control under continuous corn production. Maize germplasm CRW3(S1)C6 is a synthetic population developed with resistance to WCR by the USDA-ARS Plant Genetics Research Unit in cooperation with the Missouri Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of Missouri-Columbia. This germplasm is significantly less damaged than susceptible corn lines when under moderate to heavy rootworm pressure and offers a source of native resistance to WCR for transfer of desired resistance genes into high yielding commercial varieties.

Technical Abstract: Maize germplasm CRW3(S1)C6 is a synthetic population developed with resistance to western corn rootworm (WCR) by the USDA-ARS Plant Genetics Research Unit in cooperation with the Missouri Agricultural Experiment Station at the University of Missouri-Columbia. The corn rootworm is one of the most serious pests of corn in the US. By feeding on corn roots, the WCR causes economic losses due to plant lodging and decreased nutrient uptake, both resulting in yield loss. This germplasm offers a source of native, host-plant resistance to WCR, and should greatly improve the introgression of desired resistance genes into high yielding commercial varieties.

Last Modified: 11/27/2014
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